Archive for: ‘June 2016’

Common Sense and Compassion enter the Student Loan Bankruptcy Arena

June 30, 2016 Posted by kingcade

In the case, Nightingale v. North Carolina State Educational Assistance Authority, the debtor, Alice Nightingale, 67 years old, suffered from “intractable foot pain,” hypothyroidism, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic fatigue, all of which had worsened over the course of her chapter 13 bankruptcy. The condition prevented her from engaging in employment and from taking part in many day-to-day activities.

She was granted full disability from her teaching job by the County School Board. In a hearing in October, 2015, the court found Ms. Nightingale had established the first and third prongs of the Brunner test with evidence that she had attempted to repay the student loan, that she was “elderly” and unlikely to find future employment and that she suffered from significant medical problems. Although Ms. Nightingale’s testimony concerning her medical disabilities was credible,  the second prong of the Brunner test still needed to be satisfied.

Over the lender’s objection, the court held a second hearing in which Ms. Nightingale presented medical documents to corroborate her testimony, including letters to Ms. Nightingale’s attorney from two of her doctors, a medical report for disability eligibility, and a physician-provided list of Ms. Nightingale’s current medications.

The subsequent hearing specifically addressed the second prong of the Brunner test: whether there existed “additional, exceptional circumstances, strongly suggestive of continuing inability to repay [the debt] over an extended period of time.”

While the court agreed with the lender that Ms. Nightingale could have presented evidence of recent tests and evaluations, it found that it was not necessary that she “provide every possibly available piece of evidence that could further corroborate the unrebutted evidence in this case.”

The court concluded: “Taking into consideration the Plaintiff’s age, current living situation, inability to walk or stand for long periods of time, chronic fatigue, lack of stamina, lack of strength, diminished cognitive ability, and the likelihood that these conditions will all last for a significant period of her possible repayment period given her age and the duration of her illnesses, the Plaintiff has demonstrated that exceptional circumstances exist in this case and has met the second prong of the Brunner test.”

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For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.ncbrc.org/wp-content/uploads/Nightingale-Bankr-MD-NC-opinion-April-2016.pdf

Co-signing a loan puts more than your name on the line

June 29, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Co-signing is an all too common practice, and gives you the opportunity to help another person.  However, this responsibility comes with great risk, and little reward.

For example, you might co-sign for a car you never drive, a house you never live in or even a student loan for someone else’s college education.  When you co-sign a loan, you essentially agree to repay the loan yourself.

A survey from CreditCards.com reveals the dangers of co-signing and why you SHOULD NOT do it.

  • 28 percent of co-signers saw a drop in their credit scores because the primary borrower paid late or not at all.
  • 38 percent of co-signers had to pay some or all of the loan payments because the primary person did not pay.
  • If your income is not high, you are more likely to be pulled into a co-signing nightmare. The survey found that 58 percent of co-signers who make less than $30,000 a year had to pay some or all of a credit card bill or loan they co-signed.
  • Most co-signing requests were for auto loans, followed by personal loans, student debt and then credit cards. About half of the people who co-signed were parents.

 

Here are some additional dangers of co-signing a loan.

  • You are not considered a backup borrower. You are equally responsible for the first payment to the last.
  • If the loan or credit card is not paid, the lender can start collection actions on you right away. Do not believe that lenders first go after the primary borrower and then the co-signer. Most likely, lenders will target “the person with the better potential to pay.”
  • If collection actions are pursued, you could end up paying late fees and even have your wages garnished.
  • Late payments and collection actions are reported on your credit report.
  • This may limit your ability to borrow because, as a co-signer, you are on the hook for the debt.
  • Even if the person you are co-signing for is responsible with money, you cannot predict what the future holds for his or her finances. What if the person becomes unemployed or unable to work?

As one consumer wrote, “I have told more than one relative that while I can guarantee their willingness to pay, I cannot guarantee their health or employment.”

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Donald Trump’s Companies have Declared Bankruptcy not once- but SIX times

June 28, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Hillary Clinton recently mocked Donald Trump’s business failings in a speech and stressed to the public how disastrous he would be for our nation’s economy if he were to become President.

“He’s written a lot of books about business. They all seem to end at Chapter 11,” Clinton said.

Here they are one by one.

Bankruptcy No. 1: The Trump Taj Mahal, 1991

Trump funded the construction of the $1 billion Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, N.J., which opened in 1990. A year later, the casino was nearly $3 billion in debt, while Trump had accumulated nearly $900 million in personal liabilities. It was at that time Trump decided to file for Chapter 11 reorganization, according to the New York Times. Trump surrendered half his personal stake in the casino and sold his yacht and airline.

Bankruptcy No. 2: Trump Castle, 1992

Within a year of his first Chapter 11 filing, Trump found himself in bankruptcy court again for Trump Castle, which opened in 1985. In March 1992, the Castle filed a prepackaged bankruptcy plan, and Trump gave up his 50 percent share in the casino for lower interest rates on $338 million worth of bonds.

Bankruptcy No. 3: Trump Plaza and Casino, 1992

The Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, which opened in 1984, declared bankruptcy at the same time as the Castle. The casino had racked up $250 million in debt by 1992, after an 80 percent decline in cash flow. Trump Plaza filed for bankruptcy that spring as well.

Bankruptcy No. 4: Plaza Hotel, 1992

That same year, Trump filed bankruptcy on another Plaza in New York. Trump purchased the Plaza Hotel in Midtown Manhattan for $390 million in 1988, but it accumulated more than $550 million in debt by 1992. In December 1992, Trump forfeited a 49 percent stake in the Plaza to a total of six lenders. Trump remained the hotel’s CEO, but did not earn a salary and had no say in the hotel’s day-to-day operations, according to the New York Times.

Bankruptcy No. 5: Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts, 2004

Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts filed for bankruptcy again in 2004 when his casinos, including the Trump Taj Mahal, Trump Marina and Trump Plaza casinos in Atlantic City, and a riverboat casino in Indiana, had accrued an estimated $1.8 billion in debt. Trump agreed to reduce his share in the company from 47 percent to 27 percent in a restructuring plan, but he was still the company’s largest single shareholder and remained in charge of its operations.

Bankruptcy No. 6: Trump Entertainment Resorts, 2009

Trump Entertainment Resorts (formerly Trump Hotels and Casinos Resorts) was hit hard by the 2008 economic recession and missed a $53.1 million bond interest payment in December 2008, according to ABC News. It filed for  Chapter 11 bankruptcy in February 2009. After debating with the company’s board of directors, Trump resigned as the company’s chairman and had his corporate stake in the company reduced to 10 percent.

Trump has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, four times within two years in the 1990s, once more in 2004 and once more in 2009. But experts agree Trump should not bear all of the responsibility, as Clinton’s speech suggests, as the majority of bankruptcies happened as the overall casino industry struggled.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

‘Dance Moms’ Star Will Plead Guilty to Bankruptcy Fraud

June 27, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Abby Lee Miller, star of the Lifetime network reality show, “Dance Moms” is scheduled to plead guilty to bankruptcy fraud and failure to report more than $10,000 worth of Australian currency she brought into the country.

Miller is accused of violating a law that requires people to report bringing more than $10,000 worth of foreign currency into the country.  Court documents also seek to have her forfeit at least $120,000- although prosecutors would not confirm whether that is the value of Australian currency she failed to report.

The outspoken reality star was first charged last year with illegally trying to hide $775,000 worth of income from “Dance Moms” and spinoff projects during her Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

The investigation was prompted after the bankruptcy judge in Miller’s case was channel-surfing one night and saw the reality star on TV in December 2012 and figured she had to be making more than the $8,899 in the monthly income she was claiming.

The FBI and other agencies determined Miller hid more than $228,000 of income from appearances on “Dance Moms” and a spin-off, “Abby’s Ultimate Dance Competition” and nearly $550,000 more from personal appearances, dance sessions and merchandise sold through her personal website.

Bankruptcy trustees are experts at finding undisclosed cash, property, vehicles, boats, jewelry, antiques, and collectibles. If you are caught trying to hide assets, the consequences are big. Your discharge will be denied, and you will be unable to discharge the debts you listed in a subsequent bankruptcy filing. In addition, the potential penalty for bankruptcy crimes includes fines and imprisonment of up to five years.

Click here read more on this story.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

RealtyTrac Reports Foreclosure Activity “Flat” in May

June 24, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Foreclosure filings, which include default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions were reported on 100,841 properties in May, a number virtually unchanged when compared to April and a decrease of 21% from a year ago.  RealtyTrac’s U.S. Foreclosure Market Report reveals May was the eighth consecutive month with a “year-over-year” decrease.

Florida, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and Nevada were the states with the highest number of foreclosure filings for the month.

A total of 42,279 properties started the foreclosure process in May, down 3% from the previous month and down 18% from the previous year, according to RealtyTrac’s report. It was the 11th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease.

A total of 34,014 bank repossessions were completed in May, up 1% from the previous month but still down 24% from a year ago. It was the third consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in bank repossessions.

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Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.