Archive for: ‘February 2018’

What Happens to Your Home When Filing for Bankruptcy?

February 28, 2018 Posted by kingcade

When a person files for bankruptcy, a common concern is whether he or she will be able to keep their home. If you are filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Florida, you can use Florida bankruptcy exemptions to protect your property. Residents are provided unlimited exemptions for homestead, annuities, and the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy.

Whether or not a person who is filing bankruptcy under Chapter 7 can keep their home depends on how much equity they have in the home, as well as what state he or she is filing in. Every state has a different homestead exemption level, which sets the amount of home equity an individual may exempt from the assets being sold to satisfy creditors under Chapter 7. As long as the equity in the home is less than the amount allowed by state law in his or her state, the person filing for bankruptcy may keep their home.

Florida has one of the most generous homestead exemptions in the country. To use Florida’s exemptions, you must have resided in Florida for at least 730 days before filing your bankruptcy petition. To claim the full value of the homestead exemption in Florida, you must have owned the property for at least 1,215 days before the bankruptcy filing.  Here are some of the most common Florida bankruptcy exemptions.

If you have any questions on the topic of bankruptcy exemptions or are in a financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources: http://info.legalzoom.com/happens-home-one-files-bankruptcy-24028.html

 

 

 

When you should stop paying your credit cards and file for bankruptcy

February 27, 2018 Posted by kingcade

If you are struggling to make the minimum payments on your credit cards, the thought of filing for bankruptcy has probably crossed your mind.  Whether it is in your best interest to file for bankruptcy depends on:

  • Whether you can afford to ever pay back your debt;
  • Whether you are being sued by creditors;
  • Whether you are facing wage garnishment, and;
  • The amount of nonexempt property you own.

There are additional signs you should file for bankruptcy.  In certain cases, you may be able to negotiate with the credit card company and settle your debt for less than the total amount.  You can also request a lower interest rate on your credit cards.

If you have stopped making payments on your credit cards, you will likely begin receiving numerous calls from collection companies.  The more delinquent you are, the more frequent and harassing the calls will become.  For many people, the constant calling is enough to consider bankruptcy protection and relief.

If you are struggling to pay your credit card debt, know your rights and what debt collectors can and cannot do.  The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA) limits the tactics that debt collectors can take to collect on a debt.

Not making payments on your credit cards can result in a lawsuit being filed against you.  If the credit card company obtains a judgment against you in court, your wages could be garnished. If you are facing a lawsuit due to your outstanding debt, it is time to consider the consumer protections under bankruptcy law.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Potential Changes in Bankrupt Borrowers’ Ability to Discharge Student Loan Debt

February 26, 2018 Posted by kingcade

Prior to 1998, student loan debt (federal and private loans) were dischargeable in bankruptcy, but federal legislation enacted that same year removed the ability to do so—except in extreme circumstances, those that qualify under the “undue hardship” standard. Since the test is not regulated by any law, the courts must determine the severity of the debtor’s circumstances to qualify them for relief.

The three-pronged test to determine undue hardship:

  • You must prove that you are unable to maintain a minimal standard of living, while repaying the debt;
  • You must prove that your current destitute circumstances will last for a long time;
  • You must show that you have made “good-faith efforts” to repay your loan in the past.

Last week, the Education Dept. announced that it would seek public comment on how to determine whether borrowers have met the undue hardship standard to have their student loan debt forgiven in bankruptcy. Several Democrats, including Sen. Elizabeth A. Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, have introduced legislation that would allow student loans to be discharged via bankruptcy.

There are ways to file for bankruptcy with student loan debt. Congress has yet to established what “undue hardship” means with regard to students’ having their loans forgiven in bankruptcy; still, courts have set legal standards for proving it.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

What is considered bankruptcy fraud and what are the consequences?

February 23, 2018 Posted by kingcade

When you file for bankruptcy, you are required to list all of your property and any assets you have transferred to others within a particular time period on your bankruptcy paperwork.  Failing to do so can cause you to be accused of bankruptcy fraud.  The relief bankruptcy affords you is a powerful one, and frees you from the burden of overwhelming debt.  However, it does cost your creditors.  Bankruptcy law attempts to mitigate this loss by establishing a bankruptcy ‘estate’ (i.e. – the remaining property) after your exemptions (those assets which are kept to maintain a job and household).

Although, most people who file for bankruptcy are honest hardworking people, some individuals can be tempted to hide property and assets.  Here are some examples that if caught, could be considered criminal:

  • Failing to list all assets on the appropriate bankruptcy schedule;
  • Concealing a property transfer prior to the bankruptcy filing (i.e. – giving a boat or car to a friend or family member);
  • Creating a false document;
  • Destroying or withholding documents, and
  • Paying someone to help hide property from the court.

The consequences of engaging in such activities are harsh. Anyone who makes a knowingly false statement in association with a bankruptcy filing can be assessed fines up to $250,000 and receive up to 5 years in prison. Regardless of your occupation or status in life, if you are found guilty of bankruptcy fraud- you face real consequences, criminal prosecution and even jail time.

Bankruptcy trustees are experts at finding undisclosed cash, property, vehicles, boats, jewelry, antiques, and collectibles. If you are caught trying to hide assets, the consequences are big. Your discharge will be denied, and you will be unable to discharge the debts you listed in a subsequent bankruptcy filing.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/bankruptcy-fraud.html

Why Credit Card Debt is Bad for Your Health

February 21, 2018 Posted by kingcade

The economy is improving and with that comes consumer confidence, increased spending and rising credit card debt.  But while household income has grown over the past decade, so has the cost of living.  This has caused many consumers to access lines of credit and utilize more credit cards.  Credit card debt hit its highest point ever in 2017, surpassing $1 trillion, according to the Federal Reserve.

Close to 2 in 5 consumers who have been in credit card debt say it has affected their overall happiness, according to a recent study by NerdWallet. One-third said it negatively affected their standard of living, and 1 in 5 said it negatively impacted their health. Still, the average American has about three credit cards and a total balance of $6,375, up nearly 3% from last year, according to Experian’s annual study on the state of credit and debt in America.

There are steps you can take to deal with credit card debt with rising interest rates.  Don’t let your debt cost you another sleepless night. Sit down with an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney to discuss your options in greater detail.  The consultation is free, the relief is real. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:
 https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/budget-and-spending/2018/02/19/why-credit-card-debt-can-bad-your-health/341044002/