Attorney Timothy S. Kingcade Obtains Successful Win for Bankruptcy Client

July 30, 2018 Posted by kingcade

Second Motion to Dismiss Granted & Hearing Cancelled due to lack of evidence to support the claims

Bankruptcy Attorney Timothy S. Kingcade, founding partner of Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken successfully obtained an Order for his client in a Chapter 7 case, granting a Second Motion to Dismiss and cancelling a hearing scheduled for July 25, 2018.

“We are extremely pleased with the victory obtained for our client today. The allegations stated in the Complaint lacked sufficient evidence to support the claims. It was simply assumed that actions taken by Torres and PSI petroleum, LLC assigned liability to our client, without providing sufficient and specific allegations. The law was on our side in this case,” Kingcade said.

On March 5, 2018, the Plaintiffs in the case: Milan Gohil and GMC Law Firm, PLLC filed an adversary proceeding seeking a judgement against the Defendant. The complaint alleged three counts: (1.) False Pretenses, Fraud & Nondischargeability; (2.) False Financial Statements & Non-Dischargeability, and (3.) GMC Law Firm Claim for Attorney’s Fees. The Order Granting the First Motion to Dismiss included a provision that allowed the Plaintiffs to file an amended complaint, and on May 6, 2018 the Plaintiffs filed an Amended Complaint to Determine Dischargeability of Debt.  On May 18, 2018, Defendants filed the Second Motion to Dismiss stating the plaintiffs did not plead their claims for relief as required by law.

A court “weighing a motion to dismiss asks ‘not weather a plaintiff will ultimately prevail but whether the claimant is entitled to offer evidence to support the claims.’” (quoting Scheurer v. Rhodes). Federal Rule of Bankruptcy Procedure 7012, adopting Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12, authorizes the court to dismiss a complaint that fails to state a claim upon which relief may be granted.

The Order directs the Second Motion to Dismiss be granted, all pending motions are denied as moot and the hearing on July 25, 2018 be cancelled.

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Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken was established by managing partner and bankruptcy attorney, Timothy S. Kingcade in 1996. The firm represents clients throughout the State of Florida in Chapter 7 bankruptcy and foreclosure defense cases. The firm is committed to providing personalized service to each and every client, clearly explaining the options according to the unique circumstances of his or her life. The office environment and the service provided are centered on a culture of superior client care for the financially disenfranchised. All partners and associates at Kingcade Garcia McMaken specialize in consumer bankruptcy and foreclosure and have dedicated their practices to this area of the law. Additionally, all attorneys and staff members at the firm are bilingual speaking Spanish.

For more information visit, https://www.miamibankruptcy.com/.

 

 

Trump Administration Making It More Difficult for Defrauded Students to Erase Debt

July 26, 2018 Posted by kingcade

The Trump Administration has taken steps to make it harder for student loan borrowers who were defrauded by for-profit colleges or universities to erase their debt. United States Department of Education Secretary, Betsy DeVos, moved to make the process more difficult for students and roll back regulations set by the Obama administration.

The Obama administration took a particularly tough stance on for-profit colleges, creating rules that allowed similar claims against for-profit universities to be processed as a group. The Obama administration also created rules that prevented colleges from requiring students to sign an agreement that required them to arbitrate disputes with the colleges.

DeVos’s statement this week made it clear that student loan borrowers will now have to prove their claims on an individual basis and will be held personally accountable for their student loan debt – even if their decision to take out the loans was based on fraudulent information.

The U.S. Department of Education is seeking comments regarding what standard should be set for students to prove their case. The previous administration had used the “preponderance of the evidence standard” to win a case regarding their obligations. However, the Trump administration is considering going to the higher burden of proof of “clear and convincing evidence.”

The Department is hoping to publish a final rule by November 1, 2018. Any loans originating after July 1, 2019, will be affected by the new rule.

Consumer advocates have argued for a more aggressive stance against for-profit colleges. These advocates worry that this proposed rule will have a chilling effect on borrowers who seek relief from student loan debt. Borrowers would need to show that the college intended to mislead or defraud them. Proving intent on the part of the for-profit college can be nearly impossible. On top of this, a higher burden of proof would make winning their cases that much harder.

The proposed rules may also give borrowers less time to apply for relief. Students have six years from the date they discover a breach of contract to file a claim. The new rule limits that length of time to three years from when the borrower leaves school. Oddly enough, this time period coincides with the time period schools have to report how many students are not making payments on their federal student loans.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available.  Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. There are ways to file for bankruptcy with student loan debt.  It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

 

Miami bankruptcy attorney Timothy S. Kingcade Obtains Successful Order for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Client

July 26, 2018 Posted by kingcade

Court Finds in Favor of Kingcade Garcia McMaken Client- Plaintiff’s Objections to Defendant’s Bankruptcy Discharge Denied

Bankruptcy Attorney Timothy S. Kingcade, founding partner of Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken successfully obtained an Order for his client in a Chapter 7 case (In re: Mirta M. Ramos Case No. 16-27127-BKC-RBR) determining Objection to Discharge. Florida Bankruptcy Judge, Raymond B. Ray signed an order in our client’s favor on July 24, 2018.

“We are extremely pleased with this win for our client.  The Court found that the amount of litigation demonstrated the plaintiff’s personal animosity towards our client, especially after he went as far as to request our client’s bankruptcy discharge be revoked,” Kingcade said.

The matter came before the court for trial on April 20, 2018, upon the Plaintiff’s (Anderson Triggs) Complaint seeking revocation of the Defendant’s bankruptcy discharge. The Plaintiff and Defendant are the parents of a minor child with autism and have multiple other pending family law cases with the Court. In addition, the Plaintiff filed a lawsuit against our client in the State Court alleging civil conspiracy, defamation (libel and slander), tortious interference with a business relationship, intentional infliction of emotional distress and invasion of privacy.

The Defendant was the sole witness at trial and a first-time bankruptcy filer. The Court found that she provided credible testimony with honest answers and displayed no intention to deceive the Court.  In the end, the Court found in favor of our client and the Plaintiff’s attempts to have her bankruptcy discharge revoked were denied.

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Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken was established by managing partner and bankruptcy attorney, Timothy S. Kingcade in 1996. The firm represents clients throughout the State of Florida in Chapter 7 bankruptcy and foreclosure defense cases. The firm is committed to providing personalized service to each and every client, clearly explaining the options according to the unique circumstances of his or her life. The office environment and the service provided are centered on a culture of superior client care for the financially disenfranchised. All partners and associates at Kingcade Garcia McMaken specialize in consumer bankruptcy and foreclosure and have dedicated their practices to this area of the law. Additionally, all attorneys and staff members at the firm are bilingual speaking Spanish.

For more information visit, https://www.miamibankruptcy.com/.

How Debt Can Sabotage Your Retirement Plans

July 25, 2018 Posted by kingcade

Getting out of debt can be tough at any age, but for those nearing retirement age the challenge can be particularly daunting.

According to an Experian study published in 2017, Baby Boomers hold on average approximately $188,828 in mortgage debt and over $27,000 in other debt. Consumers who are considered Generation X who are now entering their 50s hold even more debt, with $231,774 in mortgage debt and $30,334 in other debt.

While it is normally agreed that younger individuals are more likely to carry debt because they are just starting their lives and have a longer period to pay off the debt, the survey showed that only 18 percent of households with workers 50 years or older did not have any debt. The most common types of debt include: credit cards, mortgages and car loans.

People who carry debt tend to have less discretionary income to save for the future, especially when it comes to retirement. However, with pensions being eliminated and the uncertainty of Social Security benefits, the need to save for retirement is more important now than ever. It is a given that workers need to contribute towards their 401(k) accounts, which many do. However, more workers are also borrowing from their 401(k) accounts- and paying the price for it.

In fact, approximately one in six workers over the age of 50 have taken a loan from their 401(k) to pay off some other type of debt, an unplanned major expense, medical bills or other financial issue. In the past, emergency savings accounts were meant to help people through these types of financial issues, but currently, for workers who are over 50 years old have only an average of $10,000 in their savings accounts.

The problem with borrowing from a 401(k) is it can be risky for the borrower. Many times, if the person cannot repay the loan from the 401(k) within a set period for any reason, he or she will end up owing the IRS a great deal of money, which can include a 10 percent early withdrawal tax penalty.

Prior to the 2017 tax law, a person who borrowed from his or her 401(k) had 60 days after leaving a job to repay the loan, or a penalty would be assessed. However, for loans taken from a 401(k) after the start of 2018, and the person leaves a job, the borrower can put the money back into the plan, into an IRA or a new 401(k) plan up until October of the following tax year to avoid the penalty.

How are retirement accounts treated in bankruptcy?  Individual retirement accounts like 401(k)’s and IRA’s are protected in bankruptcy, along with social security and pensions worth up to $1.245 million are all exempt from creditors during bankruptcy. This means that retirement income and savings are out of reach and protected under federal law.  That is why you should never pull from retirement accounts to pay off debt like credit cards or medical bills you cannot afford to pay.

Some people think that filing for bankruptcy means they will lose everything.  That is one of the biggest bankruptcy myths out there.  To the contrary, you will likely get to keep a lot of your possessions including homes, cars and other assets.  A vast majority of Chapter 7 cases are “no-asset” cases, which means the debtor is not required to give up any of their possessions.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

More Millennials Carry Credit Card Debt than Student Loan Debt

July 23, 2018 Posted by kingcade

Student loan debt has said to have been the biggest financial burden the Millennial generation will face, but more and more individuals in this generation say they are in fact, struggling with credit card debt. In fact, credit card debt – as opposed to student loan debt – is the most prevalent type of debt among the group.  According to a recent NBC News/GenForward survey, 46 percent of U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 34 carry credit card debt. Approximately 36 percent of them carry student loan debt. The survey reported that around three out of four Millennials carried some type of debt. More than 75 percent of those surveyed said they carried at least one type of debt, including credit cards, student loans and car loans. Only one in five Millennials reported having a mortgage debt.

One-fourth of these Millennials who carry credit card debt have balances of more than $30,000. One-fourth say that their balances are below $10,000. Around 11 percent of those in this age group surveyed have over $100,000 in debt with 22 percent of them being debt free.

The survey found that Millennials with college degrees were more likely to have credit card debt with 56 percent reported graduating with credit card debt. Forty percent who held credit card debt did not have a college degree.

When it comes to having a personal savings, 62 percent of Millennials owed more in debt than they had in a savings account. Only less than one-fourth had more in their savings account than owed in debt. Approximately one in three Millennials have less than $1,000 in savings. One-fourth of Millennials have no savings at all.

Entering the workforce with such a large amount of debt pushes young individuals to hold off on saving for the future, which leaves many of them unprepared in the event of an emergency. It also puts them at a slower start in preparing for retirement.

When asked if they would have trouble paying on an unexpected financial expense of $1,000 or more, two-thirds of them stated they would have a hard time meeting that obligation. Out of the group surveyed, those who were African-American or Latino would have the hardest time paying these obligations, although the difficulty was not exclusive to just these two groups.

If the Millennials were parents, around 48 percent of them reported that they would have a great deal of trouble in the event a financial crisis; for example, a job loss or medical emergency. Of the Millennials who did not have children, 39 percent of them reported this fact.

Credit card debt and student loan debt have caused a number of Millennials to postpone major life events like starting a family, purchasing a home and saving for retirement.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.