Posts Tagged: ‘Fannie Mae’

New Underwriting Rules Make it Easier to Obtain a Mortgage with Student Loan Debt

August 9, 2017 Posted by kingcade

If you are struggling with student loan debt the prospect of ever qualifying for a mortgage may seem out of reach.  However, last week changes made to underwriting rules by Fannie Mae could make easier for borrowers with student loan debt to obtain a mortgage.

The new rule impacts borrowers with federal student loan debt who are currently enrolled in income-driven repayment plans.  An income-driven repayment plan sets your monthly student loan payment at an amount that is affordable based on your income and family size. Your monthly payments could be capped at 10% of your income.  If your discretionary income is low enough, your monthly payment could be as low as $0.

In order to qualify for the mortgage, a borrower must meet certain debt-to-income (DTI) requirements.

A statement from Fannie Mae says that reduced payment can be used, even when the payment is $0. According to Fannie Mae, “if the lender obtains documentation to evidence the actual monthly payment is $0, the lender may qualify the borrower with the $0 payment as long as the $0 payment is associated with an income-driven repayment plan.”

These new changes will allow more borrowers to qualify for a home, but there are exceptions.  These rules do not apply to all mortgages, and are specific to “agency-backed” mortgages that represent more than half of the mortgage market.  The changes do not apply to borrowers with private student loans.  As a general rule, student loan borrowers should max out federal loans before considering private loans.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

Good News for Home Buyers with Student Loan Debt

May 12, 2017 Posted by kingcade

Mortgage lender Fannie Mae has just made significant rule changes that should make it easier for former students with costly student loan debts to purchase their first home or do a “cash-out” refinancing to pay off debt.

These new policies could be game changers for a large number of consumers. Approximately 43 million Americans are carrying student loan debt, totaling $1.4 trillion nationwide. Costly student loan debt not only impedes on borrowers’ ability to save money for a down payment, but it is also a key reason why so many young, potential home buyers remain renters or are living with their parents.

Below are three big changes that Fannie Mae has made that could affect you:

  • If you’re one of the 5 million borrowers who participate in federal-reduced payment plans on your student loan, your actual monthly payments, as reported to the credit bureaus, will count toward your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio calculations. For example, if your payments were originally supposed to be $500 a month but you have had them reduced to $100 through an income-based repayment plan, only the $100 will be added to your monthly debts for DTI purposes. Previously, lenders were required to factor in one percent of your student loan balance as your monthly payment on the student loan, even though you were actually paying a fraction of that.
  • For an estimated 8.5 million American homeowners who are still carrying student debt, Fannie Mae has lowered the costs of a “cash out” refinancing, provided the extra cash you pull out from your equity is used to retire your student debt. Among the potential beneficiaries: parents participating in “parent plus” programs that help pay off their kids’ student loan debts, and parents who have co-signed for their children’s student loans. Fannie is eliminating the usual extra fee it charges for cash-outs, as long as the funds that borrowers withdraw pay off student loan debts.
  • If you have nonmortgage debts that are being paid for by someone else such as your parents, these will no longer be included in your DTI computation, provided the payments have been made steadily for 12 months. This should improve the DTI ratios of young buyers who are still getting a little help from their parents.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

HAMP Being Replaced with New Foreclosure Prevention Program, Flex Modification

January 11, 2017 Posted by kingcade

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have announced their replacement for the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP).  The Flex Modification foreclosure prevention program is designed to help families stay in their homes by offering reductions on their monthly mortgage payments.

“The new Flex Modification announced by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the Enterprises) today was designed based on lessons learned from crisis-era loan modification programs to help borrowers stay in their homes and avoid foreclosures whenever possible,” the FHFA said in a statement.

The Flex Modification also reflects input received over the course of extensive engagement with lenders, mortgage insurers, consumer advocates, and other stakeholders, the statement adds.  The FHFA believes that by avoiding the high costs associated with foreclosures, Flex Modification will result in significant savings for the Enterprises and taxpayers, while borrowers facing financial hardships can obtain a sustainable modification.

The new modification will replace the current Fannie Mae Standard and Streamlined Modification offerings on and after Oct. 1, 2017.

Click here to read more on this story.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Mortgage Fraud Rising Most in Low Down Payment Loans

October 19, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Earlier this week, we did a posting on mortgage fraud being on the rise. As it stands, the report showed a 3.9% year-over-year increase in fraud risk, as of the end of the second quarter of 2016. CoreLogic’s Mortgage Fraud Report analyzes the collective level of loan application fraud risk the mortgage industry is experiencing each quarter.

However, what is most noteworthy about the report is the loan type that is showing the greatest fraud risk increase is high-LTV purchase loans.

Nearly two years ago, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac introduced 3% down mortgages, which have made their way into both big and small lender offerings since then, with some even offering as low as 1% down offerings.

The new low down payment programs were launched as a way to extend credit opportunities for first time home buyers since the access to credit tightened significantly after the financial crisis. But as the credit box loosens, the risk of mortgage fraud heightens, as seen in the report.

A balance is definitely needed. If current trends of higher LTV purchases and increased credit availability continue, mortgage fraud will likely rise over the next few years.

Click here to read more on this story.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

5 Tips to Bounce Back from a Foreclosure or Short Sale

September 16, 2016 Posted by kingcade

More than 9.3 million homeowners lost a home through a distressed property sale from 2006 through 2014, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR).  As rents continue to rise and mortgage rates remain low as the economy continues to improve, some who lost their homes during the housing market crash are now ready to re-enter the market.  In fact, a 2015 study by the NAR found that 1.5 million previous homeowners might be eligible to buy within the next five years, based on the time it takes to improve credit scores and save for a down payment.

Here are some tips to remember when re-entering the housing market after a foreclosure or short sale:

Know your options. For homeowners who had extenuating circumstances, such as prolonged income loss or major medical expenses, Fannie Mae has shortened the waiting period to two years after a pre-foreclosure sale – a short sale or deed in lieu of foreclosure – and to three years after a foreclosure. You no longer have to wait seven years after a bankruptcy or foreclosure to purchase a new home.

Start saving. Saving for a down payment and closing costs are the biggest hurdles for would-be home buyers. Create a strategy for savings and avoid impulse purchases.  Save your bonus checks, tax refunds and set up a direct deposit to your savings account to help build your down payment.

Repair your credit. The FHA’s minimum credit score requirement for maximum financing is 580. However, other mortgage lenders require a FICO score of 640 or higher. Here are some quick tips to help repair your credit:

  • Pay off any high-interest debt on time each month;
  • Do not take out new loans or maximize your lines of credit;
  • Ask your utility providers or landlord to report your on-time monthly payments to the major credit bureaus.

Beware of predatory lenders. Never sign any contract you are unsure of and if you encounter a lender that tries to sell you a “special” zero-down home loan or any offer that sounds just too good to be true- do not take the bait.  Always get a second opinion.  Have a real estate attorney, housing counselor or a different lender review the paperwork for you.

Enlist expert help. Not only can housing counselors help you address credit issues and set up a savings plan, they can connect you with state, local and private resources that can help get you into a new home.  If you are looking to re-enter the housing market, reach out to a “HUD-approved” housing counselor before you begin. Also, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) provides help to more than 3 million people each year. Find a NFCC-certified housing counselor to discuss your options.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

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