Posts Tagged: ‘federal student loans’

What you need to Know about Student Loan Interest

November 14, 2017 Posted by kingcade

Most college students are unaware how loan interest or capitalization works, according to a recent study.  Opting to delay payments after college or graduate school can determine how much you pay over the lifetime of your student loans.

When the interest on a student loan capitalizes, the accrued interest is added to the principal balance, which is the original amount borrowed.  For that reason, the interest charges increase because it is now based on the new higher principal.

Here are 5 examples of when capitalization occurs with federal student loans:

  1. Not making interest payments during school and during the grace period. For undergraduate and graduate unsubsidized Stafford loans, interest begins to accrue immediately after the loan is dispersed.  Subsidized loans are the best option for students, where the federal government pays the interest while the borrower is in school.
  2. Switching from an income-driven repayment plan. It is important borrowers know that just because they are enrolled in an income-driven repayment, Income-Based Repayment Plan or Pay As You Earn (PAYE), this may not be covering all of the interest accruing on the loan. While some income-driven plans stop capitalizing interest after 10 percent of the original loan balance has been paid, there are consequences from switching out of these plans. For example, unpaid accrued interest will capitalize when a borrower no longer qualifies for a financial hardship, fails to provide proper documentation for the plan’s annual enrollment or exits the plan.
  3. Forbearance or deferment. A borrower needs to be careful when selecting these options and know the consequences. Interest is still accumulating on student loans even though the loans are in forbearance or deferment.  This loan interest can accumulate quickly.
  4. Consolidation of federal loans. Consolidating multiple loans into one direct loan, means you are creating an entirely new loan.  It is important to consolidate right after graduating as a measure to reduce the capitalization interest that comes with federal loan consolidation.  Waiting longer to do so typically increases the principal balance.
  5. Defaulting on a student loan. Interest that was outstanding at the time of default will be capitalized.  The principal amount will not only become larger, but the entire balance will be due and payable immediately.

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For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

SEC Settles Fraud Charges against ITT Technical Institute

July 6, 2017 Posted by kingcade

The fraud case has been settled against ITT Technical Institute, but the Securities Exchange Commission continues to pursue top executives from the college for deceiving investors about the high rates of late payments and the number of defaults on student loans backed by the company.

ITT executives assured investors in conference calls that the programs were performing well when in fact the company was making secret payments on the delinquent accounts to delay defaults, according to the complaint.

ITT Technical Institute ended its operations in September, shutting down 137 campuses after the U.S. Department of Education cut off access to federal loans and grants and threatened to pull the school’s accreditation amid mounting lawsuits and investigations.  The company filed for bankruptcy protection, leaving 35,000 students with worthless degrees and many with high interest student loan debt.

The student loan programs are what is at the heart of the SEC lawsuit.  ITT created two in-house student loan programs.  To get investors to finance the programs, the company offered a guarantee to limit the risk of students not repaying the debt.  According to the complaint, if a certain percentage of loans defaulted, the company agreed to cover the principal, interest and fees.

The SEC said investors did not have accurate information about the performance of the debt because ITT kept the loan programs off its balance sheets.  Regulators said executives failed to tell investors that the company was facing $30 million in guarantee obligation payments at the end of 2012 and used accounting tricks to cover up the numbers.

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For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Public Service Student Loan Forgiveness Program- Here’s how you qualify

May 19, 2017 Posted by kingcade

The government’s Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program promises to cancel any remaining student debt for those who work government jobs or for non-profit organizations and have been making continuous payments for 10 years. The first borrowers to receive forgiveness will be eligible in October of this year, which is 10 years from the launch of the program.

Many teachers, public defenders, Peace Corps workers, and law enforcement officers may qualify for forgiveness. More than 400,000 people have applied for the program so far, but signing up for the program can be a confusing, (and not surprisingly) complicated process.

Here are 5 steps you can take to help ensure your eligibility:

  • Find out if your job qualifies. There are three different types of jobs eligible.
  1. Government jobs, which include federal, state, local and tribal government entities, as well as the military, Peace Corps and AmeriCorps positions.
  2. People who work for a 501(c)(3) non-profit.
  3. People who work for a non-profit that does not have 501(c)(3) status, but provides a public service.
  • Turn in the Employment Certification form annually. Ask your loan servicing company to certify that your employer qualifies on an annual basis and keep detailed records. Otherwise, you risk finding out that your job does not qualify after making years of payments.
  • Verify you have the right kind of loan. Only Direct Loans qualify for this forgiveness program.
  • Enroll in an income-driven repayment plan, each year. You must be enrolled in an income-driven repayment plan for at least a portion of your repayments.  These plans cap your monthly bill at a certain portion of your income.
  • Make 120 qualifying monthly payments. FedLoan Servicing will tell you how much you need to pay each month for the payment to count toward the 120 needed to receive debt forgiveness. If you pay any less, it will not count. And if you pay more, it will only count as one payment. Payments must be made no later than 15 days after the due date. Any payments you make while in school, during the six-month grace period after school, or while in deferment or forbearance do not count toward the 120.

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For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Americans are Dying with an Average of $62K of Debt

March 29, 2017 Posted by kingcade

According to data released in December 2016 by Credit.com, approximately 73 percent of consumers have outstanding debt when they die. On average, those consumers carried a total of $61,554, including mortgage debt. Excluding mortgages, the average balance was $12,875.

The data was collected by Experian’s FileOne database, which includes 220 consumers. Out of the 73 percent of consumers who had debt when they died, approximately 68 percent had credit card balances. The second most common kind of debt was mortgage debt at 37 percent, followed by auto loans at 25 percent, personal loans at 12 percent and student loans at six percent.

Most debt is eligible for cancellation after the borrower dies, such as federal student loan debt. However, the deceased person’s estate becomes responsible for most debt. If someone has enough assets to cover their debts, the creditors get paid and beneficiaries receive whatever remains. If there are not enough assets to satisfy debts, creditors lose out. In most cases, family members do not become responsible for the debt.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

More than 1.1 Million Borrowers Defaulted on Their Federal Student Loans Last Year

March 22, 2017 Posted by kingcade

An average of 3,000 borrowers default on their federal student loans every day. The number increased 17 percent from 2015 to 2016, according to a consumer Federation of America analysis of U.S. Department of Education data.

Despite a growing economy, 42.4 million Americans owed $1.3 trillion in federal student loans last year. By the end of the year more than 4.2 million borrowers were in default. This is up from 3.6 million the previous year, meaning that 1.1 million borrowers went into or re-entered default last year.

How to Avoid Defaulting on Student Loans 

If your debt is unmanageable, you have options:

  • If you have federal student loans, you can qualify for income-based repayment plans. The percentage of federal student loan borrowers enrolled in repayment plans has quadrupled over the past four years. Keep in mind you must re-apply every year for income-based repayment.
  • If you have private loans you have limited options. Some lenders offer forbearance if borrowers can’t make their payments. The benefits are not as vigorous as they are with federal loans and typically last no more than 12 months.

 

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com