Posts Tagged: ‘student loan debt crisis’

State Loan Forgiveness Programs Fall Short of Addressing Student Loan Debt Crisis

January 27, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Many states have developed loan debt forgiveness programs in response to the growing student loan debt crisis. But in reality, the majority of these programs benefit only a small percentage of students who accept low paying public service jobs upon graduation.

Experts believe these loan relief programs are not the answer to the student loan debt problem and are in fact; self-serving programs to entice graduates to accept low paying jobs that are not easily filled. New York recently developed a student relief program that is geared toward the graduates’ income in public service jobs rather than debt relief.

Most state-wide programs provide relief to a very narrow segment of the market. Oftentimes these are only offered to healthcare workers or lawyers who are willing to work in a federally designated area with a shortage of workers.  The relief programs are essentially luring recent college graduates with high loan debts to state jobs that offer low wages and unfavorable options for career advancement.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Student Loan Debt: The Next Crisis Facing Elderly Americans

December 23, 2015 Posted by kingcade

The number of student loan borrowers age 60 and up has increased to 2.2 million, from 700,000 in 2005, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.  Twenty-seven percent of education loans held by people age 65-74 were in default in 2013, which means they have not made a payment in 270 days or more. In fact, more than half of education loans held by people 75 and older were in default.

The government has the ability to garnish wages for non-payment of student loans- even take your tax refund, but with seniors they have added leverage- their social security.  In 2013, 155,000 seniors lost part of their retirement benefit to repay education debt, up from 31,000 in 2002, according to the GAO.

This has left many seniors helpless, as most forms of consumer debt can be discharged in bankruptcy- student loan debt cannot.  Congress said in the 1970s that such debt can go away only if a debtor can prove repaying it would impose an “undue hardship.”

However, Congress never defined undue hardship, so it has been left to the courts discretion to determine just how desperate someone needs to be to qualify for relief. Bankruptcy judges have said that to get education loans discharged, borrowers must show their entire lives would otherwise be characterized by a “certainty of hopelessness” or that repaying the debt “strips [the debtor] of all that makes life worth living.”

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Student Debt in America: Extend with a Smile, Collect with a Fist

December 4, 2015 Posted by kingcade

The student loan debt crisis is nothing new, but the interest accruing on these loans represents a new threat.  Of the 43.3 million borrowers with outstanding federal student loans, 1.8 percent, or 779,000 people, owes $150,000 or more.  And 346,000 owe more than $200,000.  A Missouri high school teacher and mother of four owes the federal government a staggering $410,000!  She took out loans for her undergraduate education, but also for law school, which she was unable to complete after becoming ill with a life-threatening autoimmune disease that required a lengthy hospitalization.  Today, the interest has accumulated to twice the original principal.  The monthly loan payments of $2,750 will stretch for 30 years.

With her forbearance options exhausted, the loan servicer has threatened to “come after her,” garnishing her wages and eventually her social security.   This woman’s story reveals the deep contradictions in the federal government’s approach to student loans.  People have always struggled with debt and access to capital is what fuels the modern economy.  Borrowing for college is often seen as a good idea because it represents an investment in a person’s future potential.  However, borrowing is risky and people often do a poor job- particularly young people- of properly weighing the interests of their present and future selves.

The private enterprise system is built to limit over-borrowing by sharing risk between lenders and borrowers.  Lenders examine credit and income histories and ask for collateral that can be repossessed in case of default.  Because most loans can be discharged in bankruptcy, lenders share on the cost of default.   But federal student loans do not work that way.   “No Cash? No Credit? No Problem!” is essentially the Department of Education’s policy on student loans.

The number of active borrowers enrolled in college has declined roughly nine million today from about 12 million in 2010, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.  But the total amount of outstanding student loan debt continues to increase, because many borrowers are struggling to pay back their older loans.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

‘Doctors’ Loophole’ in Student Loan Debt-Forgiveness Helps more Americans than Intended

November 24, 2015 Posted by kingcade

The federal government is getting ready to forgive billions of dollars in student loan debt for doctors and other professionals with expensive educations, under a law designed to help “modestly paid” workers in public service.

At issue is the 2007 student loan forgiveness program that allows borrowers who have made a decade of payments and work for government or nonprofit entities, have the rest of their debt forgiven.  The program was designed to encourage young Americans to pursue traditionally hard-to-fill positions, such as: public defenders, social workers, teachers and modestly paid doctors in underprivileged  areas.

However, the program is helping far more than intended, many of the borrowers being well-paid.  Thousands of workers with expensive graduate degrees are set to discharge five- and six-figure student debt amounts as they approach typically lucrative careers.

The biggest beneficiaries will be med school students, who owe an average of $180,000 upon graduation and are increasingly working for nonprofit hospitals to qualify for the program.  What is being called the “doctor’s loophole,” financial advisors estimate that many will have 80% or more of their original balances forgiven.

The government will not start forgiving loans under the program until 2017, a decade after it was signed into law. But the estimated tab is growing quickly as enrollment surges.  As of September, about 295,000 borrowers in all fields had submitted paperwork and were on track to have debt forgiven under the program, according to the Education Department. That is an increase of 368% from two years prior, likely reflecting growing awareness of the program and a boom in higher-education attainment during the recession. The agency projects a total 600,000 borrowers will have loans forgiven over the next decade.

Supporters of the program note it is achieving the goal of increasing interest in jobs that are tough to fill, like public defender positions.  A surge has been reported in applications for legal positions, partly linked to lawyers hoping to shed their law school debt.

The typical borrower in the program owes between $60,000 and $70,000 in student debt, with 1 in 4 owing more than $100,000, according to a Government Accountability Office report. This suggests most enrollees are workers with postgraduate degrees.  Critics say the program does little to help the millions of Americans who truly need the relief from student loan debt, like those borrowers who did not complete college and have much smaller loan balances or who graduated with degrees that pay far less in today’s economy.

Click here to read more on this story.

For borrowers who are struggling with student loan debt, relief options are available. Many student loan borrowers are unaware that they have rights and repayment options available to them, such as postponement of loan payments, reduction of payments or even a complete discharge of the debt. It is important you contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

 

Hearing Held to discuss the Student Loan Debt Crisis

April 10, 2012 Posted by kingcade

On March 20, 2012 the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Court held a hearing to discuss the student loan debt crisis. The hearing was entitled, ‘The Looming Student Debt Crisis: Providing Fairness for Struggling Students.’ Since the recession, college graduates have struggled to find not only well paying jobs, but jobs in general. In 2005, a provision was made to the bankruptcy code that prevents borrowers from discharging their student loan debt in bankruptcy court. Financial analysts predict that a crisis with effects similar to the crash of the real estate market could happen if things to do not change.

A variety of professionals who are familiar with the current affects of student loan debt on the economy gave testimonies to remove this provision. In attendance, were Attorney’s Generals from Kentucky and Illinois, borrowers who are struggling to pay their student loan debt and representatives from organizations such as the Student Loan Borrower Assistance Organization. Most of the testimonies were in agreement that student loans should be treated in bankruptcy court just as any other consumer debt. There was also talk about loan modifications being available to borrowers who cannot afford to pay back their student loans, due to economic circumstances.

To read more on this story visit:

http://www.judiciary.senate.gov/hearings/hearing.cfm?id=eb997a7c3376c76b36a041cf2a10ca10

http://www.studentloanborrowerassistance.org/2012/03/24/bankruptcy-and-fairness-for-struggling-students/

If you are in a financial crisis and are considering filing bankruptcy, contact an experienced attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.