Posts Tagged: ‘Chapter 13 Bankruptcy’

OJ Simpson Defense Attorney F. Lee Bailey Files Again for Bankruptcy

July 5, 2017 Posted by kingcade

F. Lee Bailey, OJ Simpson’s former defense attorney has filed for bankruptcy once again; this time to create a payment plan to resolve a federal tax debt owed.

Bailey recently filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, which allows a person who has a steady income to create a payment plan with creditors.  His latest bankruptcy filing will allow Bailey to discharge certain debts he could not eliminate in his Chapter 7 personal bankruptcy filing last year.

Bailey resolved his personal IRS debt through the earlier bankruptcy filing, but the federal government retained liens on some of his property that could not be discharged in the prior case.

His attorney said he estimates the IRS liens on Bailey’s property are worth about $100,000, but the government could dispute that as federal officials previously estimated their secured claims against Bailey at around $600,000.

Bailey owed the IRS approximately $5 million, in total.  Bailey’s filing in the Chapter 13 case states that he has assets worth between $100,000 and $500,000 and debts between $1 million and $10 million.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy History Suggests Intent to Hinder and Delay Creditors

November 22, 2016 Posted by kingcade

The Tenth Circuit Court recently heard the Rupp v. Pearson case where the debtor’s historical use of bankruptcy filings suggested improper purpose to hinder and delay creditors.

Mrs. Pearson had filed nine, mostly unsuccessful, bankruptcies since 1993. In 1997, she filed two unsuccessful chapter 13 cases before filing a chapter 7 petition and receiving a discharge. She later filed two more unsuccessful chapter 13 cases and had one pending chapter 13 case. She then filed another chapter 7 case seeking another discharge of her debts. The second chapter 7 case was filed two weeks after the dismissal of her chapter 13, and immediately upon the passage of the eight-year period.

The bankruptcy court inferred that Ms. Pearson was a “system-gamer.” This means that she routinely filed chapter 13 cases simply to stall collection efforts and with no actual intention of complying with the terms of her own plans. She then filed for chapter 7 relief as soon as the law allowed.

During one of Ms. Pearson’s filings, she agreed to contribute her expected tax return to the extent it exceeded $2,000. However, she kept the entire $4,829 refund and spent it on non-exempt personal items. This resulted in the bankruptcy court dismissing one of her chapter 13 cases. When she filed a chapter 7 case two weeks later, the trustee filed an adversary complaint seeking to have Ms. Pearson’s discharge denied due to her misappropriation of the tax refund with intent to defraud creditors, in violation of section 727(a)(2)(A). “In our view, the (trustee’s) complaint states a plausible claim that Ms. Pearson’s failure to turn over to the Chapter 13 bankruptcy estate the required portion of the tax refund was part of a scheme to hinder and delay creditors.”

However, the Tenth Circuit Court rejected the reasoning of the lower courts in finding that the complaint failed to state a claim for relief due to an absence of “fraud markers” and the fact that the complaint failed to negate the possibility of innocent uses of the tax refund. Rather, the circuit court noted that cases under 727(a)(2)(A) are fact-specific and not subject to rigid formulas.

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If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

How to Pay for Bankruptcy When You’re Broke

October 28, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy costs anywhere from between $500 to $3,500. If you are already in financial distress, it may be difficult to come up with the fees you will need to file. Follow these three strategies to pay for bankruptcy.

Raise the money

First, minimize your outgoing cash. For example, if you are still making credit card payments, stop making them. Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharges unsecured debts such as credit card balances. Next, try to find some additional income. This can be done by selling old electronics or taking on part-time work. You can also use your tax refund to pay attorney and bankruptcy filing fees.

Work out a payment plan

If you find the right attorney, you may be able to make payments for the services and filing fees. Ask about setting up a payment plan in the initial meeting with any bankruptcy attorney you are considering. Your attorney can also with work the court on a payment plan for your bankruptcy filing fee.

Go pro bono

If your income is less than 150% of the official poverty line for your family size, you might qualify for free legal services or waived fees. If you are not sure how to find out if you qualify, your local bankruptcy court will have information on free legal clinics and local free legal aid resources. Also, the American Bankruptcy Institute has a bankruptcy attorney directory that can help you find pro bono attorneys in your area.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

11 Steps to Take When Bankruptcy is Your Best Option

September 23, 2016 Posted by kingcade

Many Americans have had difficulties keeping up with their debts and credit obligations since the Recession. If you have similar difficulties, filing for bankruptcy may be your best option.

Here are 11 steps you should take if you are filing for bankruptcy.

  1. Explore your options. Before filing for bankruptcy, it is best to educate yourself on what filing for bankruptcy means. For example, you need to determine if you need to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Most individuals file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which means that you, as the debtor are relieved from some or all of your financial obligations.
  2. Complete the means test. This is a standard test that will compare your income to your debts to determine if you are eligible to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
  3. Hire an experienced bankruptcy attorney. A bankruptcy attorney is invaluable to you during the bankruptcy process. Your attorney will explain your options, answer your questions, make informed recommendations and even fill out the forms for you and make sure they are filed correctly and on time.
  4. Pay the fees. When filing for bankruptcy, you will be responsible for legal fees and application fees. The application fees alone can cost between $300-$500 and once you include your attorney fees, you may spend around $2,000 total.
  5. Assemble your information. Gather and organize all of your financial information. This includes: your income, expenses, assets, debts and property exemptions. You need to have all of your financial information ranging over the past six months for the bankruptcy procedure. You have to list this information in order to have your debts discharged.
  6. Determine which debts are excusable. Although bankruptcy is considered a clean slate, there are debts you will still be responsible for after your bankruptcy proceedings. For example, you will most likely still be responsible for: student loans, child support and tax debts.
  7. Attend a credit-counseling program. Within six months before filing your petition, you will need to attend a credit-counseling program at a court-approved agency. The counseling can usually be completed online or over the phone.
  8. File the forms. One reason it is important to hire a bankruptcy attorney is so that they can help you fill out the necessary forms and can remind you of the deadline.
  9. Automatic Stay. Once you complete all of the paperwork and file it, you will be granted an automatic stay that prohibits almost all creditors from continuing collection actions against you.
  10. Attend the meeting. Oftentimes, Chapter 7 bankruptcies do not end up in court. However, you will need to attend a mandatory meeting known as a 341 meeting with the creditors and a court-appointed trustee. The trustee will ask questions pertaining to your finances and your petition.
  11. Post-Bankruptcy Obligations. Once you have successfully filed for bankruptcy, you will need to attend a post-bankruptcy credit counseling. This will help you successfully manage your finances and proceed forward so that you do not end up in a financial crisis again.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

Wells Fargo and U.S. Trustee Program Reach Mortgage Settlement

September 8, 2016 Posted by kingcade

The U.S. Trustee Program recently announced that it has reached an agreement with Wells Fargo Bank requiring the bank to pay nearly $3.5 million in remediation to 8,000 homeowners in Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

The settlement arose in the Chapter 13 case of Ernestine C.J. Green, filed Nov. 30, 2011. Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows individuals receiving regular income to obtain debt relief while keeping their home. To do so, the debtor must propose a plan that uses future income to repay all or a portion of his or her debts over a three to five year period.

A debtor with a home mortgage can continue to pay the mortgage, or sometimes the Chapter 13 trustee appointed in the case pays the mortgage with income provided by the debtor’s earnings. Mortgagees or mortgage servicers are required under Bankruptcy Rule 3002.1 to file and serve notices when the mortgage payments change during the course of the Chapter 13 case.

The previous settlement in November 2015 contemplated that Wells Fargo would engage an independent reviewer to identify potential systemic issues in the bank’s operations.

“That compliance monitoring led to the discovery of a deficiency in Wells Fargo’s processes and procedures relating to the certificates of service filed with the PCNs” between 2011 and 2016, Jane Limprecht of the USTP told Bloomberg BNA. The deficiency caused “thousands of homeowners” to receive their change notices with fewer than the 21 days notice required before payment changes could take effect, she said.

The new settlement will provide refunds and credits to affected consumers, and Wells Fargo is required to change its procedures to prevent the problem from happening, again.

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.