Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Moratorium Expires, Leaving 1.45 Million Homeowners in Serious Delinquency

Even though mortgage delinquency rates have fallen by five percent since May, a record 1.45 million homeowners are seriously delinquent on their mortgages, according to figures from Black Knight.

The number of delinquencies has improved for 12 of the last 14 months, with only two increases in delinquencies reported. However, delinquency volumes have continued to increase to the point of pre-pandemic levels. According to Black Knight, around 1.45 million borrowers are at least 90 days delinquent on their mortgages as of the end of July. This stage of the process is known as a late-stage delinquency, meaning the borrower is not in foreclosure but is dangerously close. Black Knight reported that this figure was one million more than at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of these borrowers are still working with their lenders on forbearance plans.

Bankruptcy Law, Consumer Bankruptcy

Will a Bankruptcy Filing Remove a Vehicle Repossession?

A bankruptcy discharge will relieve the filer of his or her debts, which means that the person can walk away with a clean financial slate.  However, a bankruptcy case does not remove all debts from the consumer’s credit report. In fact, certain debts and the legal proceedings associated with them can be difficult to remove, including vehicle repossession.

A consumer bankruptcy case, including Chapters 7 and 13, should remove negative marks on the consumer’s credit report. In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case this is accomplished by liquidating the consumer’s assets that are not otherwise protected under a bankruptcy exemption and using those funds to pay off the consumer’s debts. Those not paid are then discharged at the end of the bankruptcy. Under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case, the consumer works with the bankruptcy trustee on a repayment plan that lasts between three to five years. At the end of that time, the remaining debts are discharged from the consumer’s record.

Bankruptcy Law, Consumer Bankruptcy

Is It Possible to Refinance a Mortgage after Bankruptcy?

One of the biggest fears expressed by bankruptcy filers is how a bankruptcy case will affect their ability to receive financing in the future.  While having a bankruptcy on a person’s credit report can make it more difficult to qualify for a mortgage, it is possible for someone who has completed bankruptcy to refinance his or her mortgage after the case is successfully closed.

A number of factors can influence how easy it is to refinance after bankruptcy, including the type of bankruptcy, whether it be a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The type of mortgage loan that the borrower is looking to refinance can also heavily influence this.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Filings Increase First Month After Moratorium Is Lifted

Foreclosure filings have increased, just one month after the moratorium on foreclosures and evictions was lifted, according to data from ATTOM. Foreclosure filings have increased 27 percent nationwide. When compared to where these numbers were in August 2020, foreclosure filings in August 2021 were 60 percent higher.

ATTOM estimates that a total of 15,838 properties received a foreclosure filing during August 2021, whether it be through a notice of default, a bank repossession, or a scheduled auction.

Bankruptcy Law, Consumer Bankruptcy

When Is Filing for Bankruptcy the Best Option?

Making the decision to file for bankruptcy is never an easy one. Many individuals hold off on filing for fear of what it will do to their credit or worse, fear of the unknown. For many consumers, taking that first step and initiating a bankruptcy case can be the best option for them. The key is deciding when to take that step.

The longer a person stays in debt, struggling to pay bills, defaulting on liabililities, the worse the financial damage will be.  Not to mention the emotional toll it takes.  By not taking action, a person can risk being sued by thier creditors or having their wages garnished. Credit card companies, creditors and even the IRS can take legal action to garnish your wages to pay off outstanding debt.

Consumer Bankruptcy, COVID-19

Consumer Bankruptcy Filings Level Off in August 2021

Bankruptcy filings leveled off last month, according to figures from technology company, Epiq. The company compiled filings through their AACER bankruptcy program which showed that in the month of August, 32,225 new bankruptcy cases were filed, including Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 consumer bankruptcy cases. This figure is down slightly from the 32,391 reported in July 2021.

Despite the fact that consumer bankruptcy filings have decreased, commercial bankruptcy filings have increased approximately one percent from July 2021 with 1,724 cases filed.

Credit Card Debt, Debt Collection, Debt Relief

How Much Debt is Too Much? Here are the Warning Signs.

For many people the word ‘debt’ is a four letter word. A word that resonates a certain fear and anxiety, oftentimes associated with credit card bills and collection calls. However, taking on certain kinds of debt can serve as a means to an end. For example, borrowing money to go to college and earn a degree, starting a business, or purchasing a home or car.

Determining how much debt is too much debt can be tricky. If you have a good job, are in good health, and keep track of your finances, and interest rates, debt can be managed effectively. If used wisely, and for things that grow in value, like a home or education, it can be useful.

student loan debt, Student Loans

What Is Next for Student Loans in the Covid Era?

Student loans have been at the forefront of the COVID-19 relief offered through the federal government. The biggest source of relief came in the moratorium on federal student loan repayments issued by the Biden administration and was extended through the end of 2021. However, this moratorium is expected to end January 31, 2022, leaving many student loan borrowers left to wonder what is next.

It is estimated that $1.5 trillion in student loan debt is now owed collectively by U.S. student borrowers. Therefore, these measures have widespread effects for many American consumers.

COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Supreme Court Ends Eviction Moratorium

The U.S. Supreme Court ended the pandemic-related federal moratorium on residential evictions imposed by President Biden’s administration. This eight-page decision effectively ends a debate that has divided party lines for months now during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ruling came down in a 6-3 decision, the court similarly divided along party and ideological lines.

The eviction moratorium was declared by Congress at the start of the pandemic. However, Congress’s moratorium expired in July 2020. The CDC then extended it by issuing a series of moratoriums under a 1944 law. The moratorium has consistently been extended, giving tenants and homeowners an opportunity to remain in their homes.

Landlords have consistently fought the moratorium, arguing that the longer it has been extended, the more they have suffered financially without any legal recourse.

The majority opinion stated that they believe the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) exceeded their authority. They claim the CDC has relied on a statute that is decades-old that authorizes the CDC to implement emergency measures, such as fumigation and pest extermination, not a nationwide months-long moratorium on evictions.