student loan debt, Student Loans

Bankruptcy Court Discharges $200,000 in Private Student Loan Debt for Colorado Couple

A major victory was scored for student loan borrowers after a U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit issued a ruling stating that a Colorado couple’s private student loan debt could be discharged in their personal bankruptcy case. The ruling allowed $200,000 of private student loan debt to be wiped out, breaking the long-standing stigma that student loan debt, particularly private student loan debt, is near impossible to discharge in a bankruptcy case.

The Colorado couple had taken out $200,000 in private student loans from Navient, one of the nation’s largest student loan issuers. The ruling comes after a similar bankruptcy case, where the borrower also had their student loan debt discharged. In that case, the loan servicer appealed the ruling.

Credit Card Debt, Debt Relief, Medical Debt, student loan debt

Tips for Managing Student Loans, Medical Debt, Credit Cards and More

DMP - Debt Management Plan acronym, business concept background

Consumer debt encompasses several different categories. However, many people often struggle with the same few categories, mainly student loans, medical debt, and credit card debt. It helps to know how to attack the debt individually in each category if a consumer is looking to pay down their various debts.

Student Loan Debt

If you are struggling with student loan debt, you’re not alone. In fact, it has been reported that Americans carry over $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. This figure amounts to an average individual load of $32,731 per student. If the consumer proceeds towards a master’s degree or professional degree following graduation from undergraduate studies, that amount can get into six figures. Paying down that debt can be a struggle for many, especially during recent times. Currently, the federal government has issued a forbearance on all federal student loan debt during the COVID-19 crisis, which has been extended past September 30.

student loan debt, Student Loans

What Borrowers Need to Know About the New Executive Order- “Continued Student Loan Payment Relief During the COVID-19 Pandemic”

A new executive order signed by President Trump is expected to give additional relief to student loan borrowers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It is important that all student loan borrowers be aware of what these changes entail and how they can affect their outstanding student loan balances.

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Congress passed the CARES Act, a $2.2 trillion stimulus bill, that included relief effort for numerous aspects of the economy. The CARES Act paused all federal student loan payments and stopped interest from being incurred on federal student loans. Additionally, the stimulus bill put a stop to all federal student loan collection efforts. However, this bill was passed at the beginning of the pandemic with the thought that relief would no longer be needed through the end of 2020 with the hopes that the COVID-19 crisis would eventually be subsiding. Given the fact that numbers of positive cases are growing, and states are struggling to manage the crisis, it has quickly become clear that additional relief was needed. The original relief offered through the CARES Act was set to expire on September 30, 2020.

student loan debt, Student Loans

5 Anticipated Student Loan Changes on the Horizon

Student loan debt has become a hot topic in Congress and on the 2020 presidential campaign. The current COVID-19 crisis further highlighted the issue, which has student loan experts anticipating several potential changes when it comes to student loan debt.

Temporary Pause for Payments

One of the more immediate changes comes with the federal stimulus package, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, & Economic Security Act (CARES Act). This $2.2 trillion stimulus bill offered many different benefits, one of them being a pause for all payments due on federal student loans. This temporary stop is set to last through September 30, 2020. In addition, interest will not accrue on outstanding federal student loans during this period. However, this coverage only includes loans serviced directly by the federal government and not by private providers. If borrowers have loans that were originally federal but later consolidated through a private entity, no immediate pause will occur on these debts. This fact has not stopped many states from working out arrangements with student loan servicers to include private student loans in the temporary relief. Given the fact that the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be holding on, this forbearance period could potentially extend beyond September 30, 2020. The Heroes Act has already included a provision to extend the forbearance by one year, but it is not decided yet whether the extension will occur.

Debt Collection, student loan debt, Student Loans

How the Supreme Court’s Recent Decision Affects Student Loan Debt Collection

A recent U.S. Supreme Court decision has implications for how student loan debts will be collected.  This week, the court issued a 6-3 ruling that debt collectors collecting on government-owned debts cannot do so by robocalling mobile devices.

The ruling came from Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants, a case involving a 1991 law banning the federal government from using robocalls to collect on debts. Specifically, the case was brought after a 2015 revision was made by Congress to the 1991 that allowed a distinct group of creditors to collect on government-owned debts, including defaulted federal student loans.

Debt Relief, student loan debt, Student Loans

President Trump Vetoes Student Loan Forgiveness Bill

A recent move by President Trump has student loan borrowers, as well as Veteran’s and Consumer groups, concerned and disheartened after he sided with Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and vetoed the bipartisan Borrower Defense to Repayment legislation.

The Borrower Defense to Repayment program is a student loan forgiveness program that was created during the Obama administration as part of an effort to provide debt relief for students who were taken advantage of by predatory colleges and for-profit universities.  Many of the borrowers who fell prey to these predatory tactics were veterans.

student loan debt

The Hidden Cost of Student Loan Debt

According to a recent report from the Student Borrower Protection Center (SBPC), student loan debt may lead to additional interest paid on other forms of debt, including credit cards and mortgages. Borrowers may not realize just how much their debt can influence these other payments and may be paying higher prices without even realizing it.

The effects of student loan debt are far-reaching. Approximately 44 million Americans carry a collective $1.6 trillion in student loan debt. Most of these individuals also carry other forms of debt, the most common of these being mortgages and credit card debt. According to this SBPC study, these individuals are also forced to pay up to tens of thousands more in extra costs when purchasing a home or car or even using their credit card.

Coronavirus, COVID-19, student loan debt

Tips for Keeping Student Loan Debt Under Control During Covid-19

Student loan debt was already a financial burden for many Americans, but the COVID-19 crisis has made it worse. It helps to understand what options are available for borrowers who are struggling to keep up with their student loan debt during this time of crisis.   

Federal Assistance and Forbearance

In March 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act in light of the growing pandemic. The CARES Act includes certain provisions that lighten the burden carried by student loan borrowers. As of March 13, 2020, most federal student loans were put on administrative forbearance which means no payments were due, beginning March 13, 2020 and ending September 30, 2020.

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Debt Relief, student loan debt

New Legislation Provides Student Loan Forgiveness to Frontline Healthcare Workers

Healthcare workers on the frontlines are putting their lives at risk every day during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which has many asking what can be done to financially help these dedicated individuals.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) plans to introduce new legislation that will do just that by forgiving outstanding student loan debt carried by these frontline healthcare workers. The legislation is titled The Student Debt Forgiveness for Frontline Health Care Workers Act. The hope behind this new legislation is that by forgiving student loan debt for these workers, a large financial burden will be lifted. Additionally, this incentive could possibly drive others to join the healthcare industry and continue the fight against COVID-19.

Coronavirus, COVID-19, student loan debt, Student Loans

How Student Loan Borrowers Will Benefit from the Stimulus Bill

The recently passed $2.2 trillion stimulus bill provides several different forms of financial assistance for American consumers during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis. The new bill also provides options for student loan borrowers who are struggling to keep up on their loan payments, which comes as good news for the over 44 million borrowers holding more than $1.5 trillion in outstanding student loan debt.

Borrowers who have federally owned student loans will not have to pay on their loans through at least September 30, including Parent PLUS Loans. This payment suspension will occur automatically and does not need to be requested by the borrower.