Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Moratorium Expires, Leaving 1.45 Million Homeowners in Serious Delinquency

Even though mortgage delinquency rates have fallen by five percent since May, a record 1.45 million homeowners are seriously delinquent on their mortgages, according to figures from Black Knight.

The number of delinquencies has improved for 12 of the last 14 months, with only two increases in delinquencies reported. However, delinquency volumes have continued to increase to the point of pre-pandemic levels. According to Black Knight, around 1.45 million borrowers are at least 90 days delinquent on their mortgages as of the end of July. This stage of the process is known as a late-stage delinquency, meaning the borrower is not in foreclosure but is dangerously close. Black Knight reported that this figure was one million more than at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of these borrowers are still working with their lenders on forbearance plans.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Filings Increase First Month After Moratorium Is Lifted

Foreclosure filings have increased, just one month after the moratorium on foreclosures and evictions was lifted, according to data from ATTOM. Foreclosure filings have increased 27 percent nationwide. When compared to where these numbers were in August 2020, foreclosure filings in August 2021 were 60 percent higher.

ATTOM estimates that a total of 15,838 properties received a foreclosure filing during August 2021, whether it be through a notice of default, a bank repossession, or a scheduled auction.

COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Supreme Court Ends Eviction Moratorium

The U.S. Supreme Court ended the pandemic-related federal moratorium on residential evictions imposed by President Biden’s administration. This eight-page decision effectively ends a debate that has divided party lines for months now during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ruling came down in a 6-3 decision, the court similarly divided along party and ideological lines.

The eviction moratorium was declared by Congress at the start of the pandemic. However, Congress’s moratorium expired in July 2020. The CDC then extended it by issuing a series of moratoriums under a 1944 law. The moratorium has consistently been extended, giving tenants and homeowners an opportunity to remain in their homes.

Landlords have consistently fought the moratorium, arguing that the longer it has been extended, the more they have suffered financially without any legal recourse.

The majority opinion stated that they believe the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) exceeded their authority. They claim the CDC has relied on a statute that is decades-old that authorizes the CDC to implement emergency measures, such as fumigation and pest extermination, not a nationwide months-long moratorium on evictions.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Wave of Foreclosures and Evictions Expected as Federal Moratoriums Expire

The federal moratorium on foreclosures and evictions officially expired over the weekend, leaving the legal system braced for an impending wave of filings. To offset the wave of foreclosure and eviction filings which will no doubt be on the way, lawyers and courts are finding creative solutions to the problem.  

The eviction moratorium was put into place as a way to help tenants and homeowners who were left with no income due to the coronavirus causing widespread shutdowns across the country.

President Biden has pushed on Congress to approve a one-month extension for all residential evictions. However, at this time, no federal congressional action has been taken to extend the moratorium. 

COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Bank of America, Chase and Wells Fargo Announce Plans Following Expiration of Mortgage Foreclosure Moratoriums

As the stimulus programs put into place come to an end this year, many homeowners worry about what their futures will hold. Approximately 2.1 million homeowners are still utilizing these mortgage forbearance plans offered following the start of the pandemic, according to figures from the Mortgage Bankers Association, which means that many people are still set to be adversely affected once the moratoriums are lifted. 

Even more concerning, nearly 1.8 million families are not in forbearance on their mortgages but are at least 90 days delinquent on their mortgage accounts as of April 2021, according to data from Black Knight.   

COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Emergency Mortgage Relief Could Extend Through 2022

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of homeowners have benefited from the mortgage relief programs offered by the federal government, and some private lenders.  Now that a year has passed, approximately 2.5 million homeowners are still enrolled in some sort of mortgage relief program, whether it be payment suspension or mortgage forbearance, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) 

It is for this reason that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) wants to extend these provisions and programs further into the future to ensure that these homeowners are not forced into foreclosure.  

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

10 Percent of American Families at Risk of Eviction, Foreclosure

More than 11 million American families are facing a crisis when it comes to housing, specifically when it comes to making their rent and mortgage payments, according to a new report released by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

The CFPB conducted a survey of the housing market during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and found that approximately 2.1 million American families are at least three months or more behind on their mortgage payments. Approximately 8.8 million of them are late on paying their rent.  

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

How to Save Your Home from Foreclosure in Florida

Many Americans have been able to utilize the federal and state mortgage foreclosure moratoriums during the COVID-19 crisis to stay in their homes. But a record number of homeowners have fallen behind on their mortgage payments. According to statistics from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the number of Americans who have fallen three or more months behind on their mortgage payments increased by 250 percent in 2020, reaching a record of over two million households nationwide. These figures have not been seen since the Great Recession.  

It is estimated that the total amount owed is nearly $90 billion in deferred principal, interest, insurance, and tax payments. Financial analysts predict that the nation will soon see a wave of foreclosure lawsuits hitting the court system. However, it is possible for a consumer to stop the process from getting out of control and allow the individual to stay in his or her home.  

The first step should always be for the homeowner to reach out to his or her mortgage lender. Pursuing a foreclosure costs the lender money. In fact, they end up losing more money through that process than they would gain if they worked on a deal with the homeowner to stay in the home, which is why so many of them are more than willing to negotiate 

Many mortgage lenders are offering loan deferral programs or are either lowering or deferring interest payments for a temporary period. They may also be willing to waive late fees and penalties. The key is the homeowner needs to ask, first. The lender is not going to proactively reach out to the homeowner to see if he or she needs assistance. Ultimately, it is up to the homeowner to request this.

If the consumer has already reached out to the lender and is not able to realistically catch up on payments and late fees, it may be best to sell the property to pay back what is owed. For this plan to truly succeed, the borrower needs to price the property to sell. The longer the home stays on the market, the longer the homeowner will be behind on his or her payments, making the home even more difficult to sell.   

While the home is in default or foreclosure, the homeowner will likely be receiving mail from the court or lender regarding important dates and opportunities to make a deal on his or her payments. It is extremely important that all mail related to the home be opened immediately, be read, and if a response is required, be responded to quickly. The last thing the homeowner wants to do is miss an important court date or fail to take advantage of an opportunity if the lender is offering lower payments or a deal that could allow the person to remain in his or her home 

Lastly, to keep the home, it is important to continue making mortgage payments, if possible. Many people will take the idea of a moratorium and assume it means he or she does not have to pay on the mortgage debt during that periodThe problem is, during a moratorium, mortgage bills continue to incur, and if payments are not made, the homeowner will fall behind even more than he or she was at the start of the moratorium. The mortgage bill is arguably one of the most important payments the homeowner makes, even above other bills or debts, such as credit cards or medical debt.

Filing for bankruptcy can help. It may seem counter-intuitive, but when someone is facing foreclosure and is in the middle of a major financial crisis, bankruptcy can be a viable option to help save that person’s home. Ultimately, it depends on your specific financial situation and the type of bankruptcy you file – but bankruptcy can be used as a tool to help keep your home.

The Power of the Automatic Stay

If your home is already set for a foreclosure sale, you may be asking, “how can I make it stop?” Filing for bankruptcy can put a stop to the process or at the very least postpone it. As soon as a petition for bankruptcy is filed, the court issues an order called an “automatic stay,” which puts an immediate halt to all collection activities that were happening to the homeowner before the petition was filed. This automatic stay also applies to foreclosure cases.  Creditors (including your mortgage lender) must immediately cease collection attempts. Even if the mortgage lender has the home scheduled for a foreclosure sale, the sale will be postponed during a pending bankruptcy.

Please click here to read more.  

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between keeping your home or losing it in foreclosure. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure, please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com 

 

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Report 2021: What to Expect in the Coming Months

Foreclosures have been essentially at a standstill due to the moratorium issued by state and local governments on foreclosures and evictions, as well as forbearance programs to help keep families remain in their homes during this difficult time. However, these efforts will expire at some point, which has many worrying about what will happen once these programs end.  

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, approximately 500,000 borrowers avoided foreclosure during the last quarter of 2020 due to various relief programs available to them, including the forbearance program offered through the CARES Act.

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Covid-19 Mortgage Bailouts Decline, New Foreclosure Crisis Looming

Homeowners are struggling to keep up with their mortgage payments as the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis continues. The mortgage bailouts offered by the federal government and private sector during the crisis have helped temporarily, but as the number of bailouts begin to decline, many homeowners are finding themselves facing the possibility of impending foreclosure.

According to figures from Black Knight, a mortgage technology and data firm, approximately 3.7 million borrowers are still receiving assistance through federal government and private sector mortgage forbearance programs.  This figure represents nearly seven percent of all active mortgages. Forbearance plans allow borrowers to temporarily delay monthly payments for anywhere between three months to a year.