Debt Collection, Debt Relief

Tips for Getting Your Debt Out of Collections

Getting out of debt can seem like a never-ending battle. Once someone falls behind on one or more bill payments, the debt collector calls can be relentless. The late fees and penalties that are often assessed on past-due accounts, not to mention the interest rate spikes that come along with missing a payment, can make getting back on one’s feet nearly impossible. There are certain steps that can help consumers who are facing these types of situations get out of debt and stay out.

Remain Calm.

It can be easy to react out of stress or panic and make decisions that someone would not normally have made, especially when dealing with debt collectors. It is important that whatever decisions are made by the consumer are ones that are carefully considered and logical. Many consumers may react out of fear and enter into payment agreements that they would not normally agree with and cannot realistically afford just to get the debt collector to back down. The aggressive techniques used by many debt collectors have this motive in mind. Make sure you understand and get the terms in writing, first. Never agree immediately to a payment arrangement over the phone with a debt collector.

Debt Collection, Debt Relief

5 Disclosures You Should Never Make to a Debt Collector

In life, honesty is always the best policy, but not when it comes to communicating with a debt collector. In fact, it is best to use caution when making any statements to a debt collector, as they could be recorded and used against a person later. By no means should the consumer lie to the debt collector, but he or she should at least use reasonable care when talking with someone who is collecting a debt.

It is important to be aware of the tactics that many debt collectors will use to get you to pay on a debt. They often will resort to scare tactics or bullying to put the individual in fear of losing his or her home or livelihood if he or she does not pay on the debt. One key piece of advice is to know that all consumers have rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).

Bankruptcy Law, Credit Card Debt, Debt Relief

Tips for Negotiating with Debt Collectors

Working with a debt collector is normally not a pleasant experience. Debt collectors are persistent when trying to reach a debtor, and many will stop at nothing until they are successful at getting payment. Any time someone is late on or has missed a payment, that person should expect some type of communication from a collector, whether it be in written form or through phone calls. Many times, it is a combination of both. It helps to know your rights when dealing with a debt collector and know how to work with them on negotiating your debt.

Get Verification of the Amount Owed

Never assume that the information the debt collector is providing is completely accurate. Believe it or not, many scams are out there where debt collectors attempt to collect on debt that belongs to another person or is entirely past the statute of limitations. As soon as the debt collector makes contact, ask them to provide written verification of the amount owed.

Also, verify the credibility of the debt collector. Ask for the person’s name, the name of the company, a business address and a phone number. It pays to do some research into the company to see if they are, in fact, a legitimate debt collector. Also, review the amount they say is owed against your own records to ensure that the amount is accurate. Collection agencies are bound by law to send a validation letter within five days of contacting a debtor, listing the debt amount, the original creditor, and what the debtor should do in the event an error is discovered. It could be possible that a debtor owes on a specific debt but in a smaller amount than the collector is arguing they owe. Always verify before making payment.

Debtor Rights

One big mistake many debtors make is assuming that they have no rights when speaking with a debt collector, which is very far from the truth. Because many times, a debt collector’s actions will border on the edge of harassment or threats, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, or FDCPA, was enacted, which prohibits a debt collector from deceiving, threatening or harassing a debtor while collecting on a debt. The FDCPA prohibits any type of communication that threatens the debtor, includes profane language, or makes the debtor feel harassed. The collector can also not lie to the debtor, threaten to arrest or deport him or her, or threaten to take the person to court without any intention of doing so. A debt collector is also prohibited in the times that he or she can contact a debtor. Calls cannot be made before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m. If a debt collector is violating the FDCPA, inform them of the violation and demand that no more communication be made. The collector can be reported to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as well as the Better Business Bureau and the Florida Attorney General.

Look at the Type of Debt

It also helps to know what type of debt is involved when dealing with a collector. Many times, different options exist for payment plans based on the type of debt, whether it be credit card, medical debt, or something secured with collateral, like a car or home. Medical debt creditors tend to be more willing to work out a payment plan than credit card creditors. Also, if the debt involved is a medical debt, double check to make sure that the debt was processed by insurance first. Student loan service providers may also be more likely to work with a debtor on an income-based repayment plan or even may offer a deferment option to allow the debtor to get back on his or her feet first before continuing payment.

Some collectors will work with a debtor on a lump sum payment that is lower than the amount owed in exchange for releasing the debt. Ask if that is a possibility on the balance, and if it is, see if the collector will settle for a partial repayment over receiving nothing.

Be Aware of the Statute of Limitations

As mentioned previously, debt collectors will also try to get a person to pay on a debt that is past the state’s statute of limitations. It is highly possible that a phone call from a debt collector is on a debt that is past the time frame in which they have a legal right to pursue payment. The statute of limitations for Florida is five years for written contracts and four years for oral contracts or revolving accounts, such as credit cards.

Use the “Bankruptcy” Word

Sometimes it does benefit the debtor to mention that he or she is considering filing for bankruptcy. The collector wants to receive payment, and if the debt is something that is unsecured, such as a credit card or medical debt, it could easily be discharged through bankruptcy. If this happens, the creditor will end up receiving nothing. Tell the collector that bankruptcy is being considered not as a threat necessarily but more as a push to motivate them to negotiate. However, only do this if repayment in any form is an actual possibility. Otherwise you could be making empty threats.

Always Get It in Writing

When dealing with debt collectors, any time someone works out an agreement with the collector, it is imperative that he or she memorialize the agreement in writing. This rule of thumb applies for whatever type of agreement is reached, whether it be a debt repayment plan, a change in payment terms, or a lower interest rate. Request that the agreement be sent via mail, and always review the terms very carefully before signing on the dotted line. Make sure nothing has changed from what was originally discussed. Many times, a debt collector may add some additional language that was not agreed upon, and once the contract is signed, the debtor is bound by that agreement. Always review before signing.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

What Happens during the Debt Collections Process?

Debt collections are easily one of the most stressful situations a person can face. Dealing with debt collectors is also one of the most complained about issues, and it is not hard to see why. It helps to know how to handle debt collectors and the protections you have as a consumer.

When you are struggling to make ends meet financially, it can be frustrating to have debt collectors calling you or even worse, the threat of having your wages garnished or a lawsuit filed against you. A strong federal law, called The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA), protects consumers against certain unfair collection practices, which include:

  • Calling you repeatedly to annoy or harass you.
    • Trying to collect more than you owe.
    • Fail to send a written notice of the debt.
    • Threatening violence.
    • Threatening dire consequences (i.e. – lawsuits, criminal prosecution, wage garnishment, jail time, permanently ruining your credit).
    • Using profanity and abusive language.
    • Calling before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m.
    • Revealing debt to third parties (i.e. – family, neighbors, friends, co-workers, etc.).
    • Contacting you at your work, after you have requested them to stop.
    • Failing to verify disputed debts.
    • Ignoring cease communication requests.

What Happens During Collections?

The first thing a consumer will notice after an account has been sent to collections is the number of calls from the creditor or the collection agency will increase. Debt collectors will try any means possible to get a hold of the debtor and get payment, even if this means violating a consumer’s rights. The debt collector will contact the consumer at any location possible, including home, cell phone or work number. When it comes to contacting you at work, certain restrictions do exist. The debt collector may not disclose any information regarding the individual’s debt, and if the individual requests that the communication stop at that point at the place of employment, under The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA),  the collector may not contact the person at work further.

The FDCPA also dictates other requirements as to when the collector can call, which is only between the hours of 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. The debt collector is also restricted from using any language or tactics that may be deemed harassing, threatening or abusive.  If the debt collector tries to contact other third parties, such as friends or family members of the individual, they may not disclose information on why they are trying to reach the debtor but can only contact them to get the correct contact information for them.

Validation of Debt

Consumers have the right to request written validation of the debt from the debt collector. In fact, the debt collector is required to notify you that he or she has the right to request this validation within 30 days after receiving the first written communication from the debt collector. Requesting validation of the debt from the debt collector can also be done over the phone. By requesting validation of the debt, the consumer is making the debt collector verify that the debt is actually owed.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

 

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

How Long Can a Debt Collector Pursue an Old Debt?

When it comes to debt collections, certain rules do exist as to how long a debt collector can attempt to collect on a debt. These rules apply to the actual lawsuits themselves, as well as credit reporting.

Statute of Limitations

Every state has what is referred to as a statute of limitations, laws which set a limit as to how long an individual has to bring a legal claim on a certain matter. States have limitations on how long a debt collector has to collect on a debt. In Florida, the statute of limitations varies for different types of debts. For written contracts such as personal loans, the statute of limitations is five years. So once this type of debt is more than five years past due, the lender can no longer sue in order to collect owed money.

However, the problem is the debt collectors are not obligated to tell the consumer that they are past the statute of limitations. It is up to the consumer to do the research and know his or her rights if a debt collector is trying to communicate with a them regarding an old debt.  There are ways to deal with old debt. Most states have a statute of limitations for debt collections that restricts collections on debts that are four to six years after the date the debtor last made a payment.

One thing to keep in mind, if you think the debt is past the statute of limitations- do not pay on it, until you confirm. A single payment towards an old debt can revive that debt, restarting the statute of limitations.

Indefinite Attempts to Receive Payment

Technically, while there are laws that state how long a debt collector can take legal actions to collect on a debt, there is no law saying they cannot keep trying to contact the individual to pay on the amount.  For all purposes, the original creditor can try to get the individual to pay indefinitely, unless the debt has been settled or discharged in bankruptcy.

The law does restrict certain tactics taken by third-party debt collectors who are trying to collect on a past-due debt. The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act (FDCPA) specifically prohibits any communication from third-party collectors that is abusive, harassing or threatening. If a third-party debt collector is continuing to call to the point where the communication is harassing, the individual can send a written letter ordering that debt collector to cease and desist.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

What is Considered Harassment by a Debt Collector?

According to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), debt collectors cannot harass, oppress or abuse consumers or anyone else they contact. Harassment by a debt collector can come in different forms.

Here are some examples of harassment:

  • Repetitious phone calls that are intended to annoy, abuse or harass you or any person answering the phone
  • The use of obscene or profane language
  • Threats or violence or harm
  • Publishing lists of people who refuse to pay their debts
  • Calling you without telling you who they are
  • Threats of arrest
  • Calling you before 8 a.m. and after 9 p.m.

If you have been harassed by a debt collector, you can sue for violations of the FDCPA. If you sue and win, the debt collector must pay your attorney’s fees and may also have to pay damages.

Debt collectors are also prohibited from using false, deceptive or misleading practices including misrepresentations about the debt.

Here are some examples of misrepresentations of debt:

  • The amount owed
  • That the person is an attorney if they are not
  • False threats to have you arrested
  • Threats to do things that cannot legally be done
  • Threats to do things that the debt collector has no intention of doing

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

https://www.consumerfinance.gov/ask-cfpb/what-is-harassment-by-a-debt-collector-en-336/

http://timothykingcade.com/?p=6622

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

When Debt Collectors Call Know your Rights

When a debt collector calls, it’s important to know your rights.  In July, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau required debt collectors to do their “due diligence” to help ensure they are collecting on legitimate debt and put a cap on their weekly attempts to reach a consumer.  The bureau also increased enforcement, bringing more than 25 cases on debt-collection tactics that deceive or abuse consumers.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) is a federal law that protects consumers against unfair collection practices, including:

  • Calling you repeatedly to annoy or harass you;
  • Trying to collect more than you owe;
  • Failing to send a written notice of the debt;
  • Threatening violence, using profanity or offensive language;
  • Threatening dire consequences (i.e. – lawsuits, criminal prosecution, wage garnishment, jail time, permanently ruining your credit);
  • Calling you before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m.;
  • Revealing debt to third parties (i.e. – family, neighbors, friends, co-workers, etc.);
  • Contacting you at your work, after you have requested them to stop;
  • Failing to verify disputed debts;
  • Ignoring cease communication requests.

It is important that consumers verify everything when it comes to a debt they may (or may not) owe.  In a recent CFPB survey, half of Americans contacted about a debt in the past year said they were given inaccurate information about what they owed. Debt collectors are legally required to follow up their phone call with a written notice detailing the debt.

Understand that just because someone is calling to collect a debt, does not mean you should pay it right away.  It is always important to verify.  The collection attempt could be for a so-called zombie debt that is past the statute of limitation or a debt collection scam.

If you do in fact owe the debt, make sure and take notes. Write down every name and employee number you speak with, including the agency, the number they called, the time of the call, etc. Take notes on what was said.  This detailed record keeping can prove helpful if you need to file a complaint about the debt collector’s behavior in the future.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/12/know-your-rights-when-a-debt-collector-calls.html

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

One Wrong Move Can Bring your ‘Zombie’ Debt Back to Life

In the spirit of Halloween, we want to warn you about zombie debt.  As the name suggests, zombie debt is a debt that you thought was dead but has come back to life.  This could be a debt you already paid off, a debt you settled with a creditor, a debt where the statute of limitations has expired, a debt that was wiped out in bankruptcy, or a debt that was never yours to begin with.

Zombie debts are old debts.  That in itself is what makes them so dangerous to consumers, especially when debt collectors apply high-pressure tactics to have you pay up.

Another downside, these debts are oftentimes hard to verify. As debts are sold and resold, information can vanish, leading collectors to seek payment on erroneous debt.  Making even a single payment on an old debt can reset the statute of limitations, leaving you vulnerable to a lawsuit.

Debt collection is the largest source of consumer complaints to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, with more than 85,000 complaints filed in 2015.  The leading complaint: Consumers being harassed for debts they did not owe.

Here are some steps you can take to avoid becoming a victim and put zombie debt to rest for good:

  • Request a validation letter.  This will outline details, including the original creditor, the amount of the debt and how you can challenge it. This will help you verify that it is your debt and has not already been paid.
  • If you already paid the debt: Write a letter to the collections agency demanding that it cease contact. The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act requires them to do so. Remember: You cannot legally be sued for a debt that is past the statute of limitations, even though collectors may still try.
  • Pull your credit report to determine whether it is being reported to the credit bureau.  You can do so for free at www.annualcreditreport.com.
  • Know your rights. Do not let a debt collector bully you.  The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act protects you against abusive collection tactics.
  • If the debt is not yours, it is otherwise invalid: Write a letter challenging the debt within 30 days of the initial contact.
  • If you do owe the debt and can pay, resolving an unpaid account can end the collection calls and improve your credit score. Get any payment agreement in writing before sending money.
  • If you do owe the debt and cannot pay: Tell the creditor you cannot afford to pay. Never give your credit card information or bank account information to a creditor.  Instead, pursue debt relief through credit counseling or bankruptcy.

No matter what, be proactive. Do not ignore anything you receive in the mail from a debt collector and make sure and keep all of your correspondence in writing.

At the law firm of Kingcade & Garcia we want you to have a safe and Happy Halloween this year!   If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2016/10/31/debt-collectors-zombie-debt-payment/92666504/

http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2016/10/31/dont-get-bit-by-zombie-debt-this-halloween/

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

The FCC Wants Debt Collectors to Stop Calling So Much

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently approved a proposal that would reduce the number of collection calls consumers receive.  A budget deal was approved last year that provided government exemptions from the Telephone Consumer Protection Act that blocks solicitors from sending automated calls to cell phones under certain conditions. Congress called on the FCC to limit those exemptions.

The proposal limits government debt collectors to three calls per month, which can only be made if an individual is late on making a payment. It also allows calls informing people about payment plans, though borrowers can request to opt out.

With taking this first step toward implementing the requirements, Congress recognizes the importance of collecting debt owed to the U.S. and respecting the consumer protections allotted in the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. It is still subject to two rounds of comments- the first on June 6, and the second on June 21.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

12 Times You Can Sue a Debt Collector

Millions of Americans struggle with debt and in turn have to deal with collection calls.  While some debt collectors abide by the legal debt collection practices, many do not.  Fortunately, there are protections in place that allow consumers to fight back if debt collectors violate their rights. A strong federal law, called the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) protects consumers against unfair collection practices and helps prevent creditor abuse and harassment.

Below are 12 times when you can sue a debt collector.

  1. Calling early & calling late. Debt collectors should not be calling you before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m. It is a violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) for a collector to call at a time that is known to be inconvenient. This is typically a time you are away from work, at home with your family or sleeping.
  2. Calling at other Inconvenient Times. If you have told a collector not to call at a certain time, that is also a violation of the FDCPA. If you work nights and tell the debt collector not to call you during particular hours, they cannot do so.
  3. Discussing with Third Parties. Debt collectors cannot call a family member and say that you owe them money. This is another violation of the FDCPA. They can call and ask how to reach you, but they cannot discuss your debts with anyone besides you. The only exception is that debt collectors can contact your spouse.
  4. When a Lawyer’s Involved. If a debt collector knows you have hired an attorney and they contact you that is a violation of the FDCPA. The reason is that the consumer may be in the process of filing for bankruptcy.
  5. Making False Threats. If collectors make threats and do not follow through, that is a violation of the FDCPA. This can include both legal threats such as a lawsuit, or any other type of threats.
  6. Calling the Wrong Party. If a collector has the wrong number and continues to call you after you have told them who you are, that is grounds for a lawsuit. The collector may think that you are lying about your identity, so they keep calling, thinking that you will come clean.
  7. Using Pre-recorded or automated voice calls. “Robocalls” are an illegal form of debt collecting. The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) prohibits any company to use automated or pre-recorded calls to collect debts.
  8. Using Automatic Phone Dialing Systems. Telephone systems that automatically dial numbers one after another and can contact consumers up to five times per day are illegal under the TCPA.
  9. Misrepresenting the Nature of the Debt. Oftentimes, debt collectors pressure family members of deceased relatives to pay their debts by saying they are responsible, even if they are not. This is illegal and has severe penalties.
  10. Threatening Violence. Under no circumstances is a debt collector permitted to threaten violence to coerce consumers to pay their debts.
  11. Using Profanity. The FDCPA protects debtors from verbal abuse such as the use of obscene or profane language. If it is meant to cause harm, it is grounds for a lawsuit.
  12. False Representation. If a collector does not disclose who they are or why they are calling, that is a violation of the FDCPA. Collectors must disclose to the consumer who they are and that they are attempting to collect a debt either in writing or over the phone.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.