Debt Relief, student loan debt, Student Loans

White House Considering Executive Action to Cancel Portion of Nation’s Federal Student Loan Debt

The Biden administration is considering issuing an executive order that would effectively cancel some portion of the $1.6 trillion in federal student loan debt held by 43 million Americans. This statement comes as no surprise as student loan forgiveness and student loan reform were consistently topics of discussion during the 2020 Presidential campaign.  

The statement came last Thursday from White House press secretary Jen Psaki. She indicated the administration was looking into whether President Biden had the executive authority to cancel a portion of the nation’s outstanding student loan debt. However, they also indicated that they would welcome any legislation brought forth by Congress to do the same.  

Debt Relief, student loan debt

Freeze on Student Loan Payments Extended Through September 2021

The U.S. Department of Education has placed a pause on student loan payments through September 2021. This is among the 17 executive actions President Biden has signed since taking office. This Order, along with the extension on eviction and foreclosure moratoriums, are an effort to relieve the economic impact caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Prior to the Order, payments were scheduled to resume at the end of January.

Student loan debt continues to be a national crisis, as debt tops more than $1.6 trillion. What was once a looming financial crisis, has now been exacerbated by job losses and pay cuts caused by the pandemic. Approximately 1 in every 5 student loan borrowers are in default, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Many are struggling to pay for basic necessities and provide for their families. With the extension of the forbearance agreement, borrowers will not be forced to decide between paying their student loans and putting food on the table.

COVID-19, Debt Relief, Foreclosures

Biden Extends Ban on Evictions and Foreclosures through March

Shortly after being sworn in as the nation’s 46th president, Joe Biden signed several executive orders. One of these signed orders included extending the ban on evictions and foreclosures for individuals affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

This new order extends the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) moratorium that was set to expire on January 31, 2021. The CDC’s order first went into effect in September 2020. This new executive order extends the ban for at least an additional two months past the expiration date.

Credit Card Debt, Debt Relief

Best Ways to Pay Off a Large Credit Card Bill

Many Americans ended the year 2020 with large credit card balances, and now with the new year in full swing, they may be looking for ways to chip away at that debt. Carrying a high balance on credit cards not only makes life harder, but it can present a major threat to that person’s financial stability. Several different options are available to consumers seeking to reduce or pay off their large credit card balances. What works for one consumer may not work for another. Ultimately, it depends on the person’s credit history and current financial situation as to what will work for him or her.  

Personal Loans 

One popular method to pay down a credit card has been by taking out a personal loan to pay off the balance. This method is also known as debt consolidation, and it can be a successful way for consumers to pay down several large balances at once. By taking out a personal loan, he or she can use this money to pay off all these outstanding balances, leaving just the loan balance to pay a monthly basis. It effectively transfers credit card debt to a one, singular debt with a lower interest rate. Not only does this make repaying the amount easier, but it can also often save a lot of money in interest that would otherwise build up over time on multiple credit card balances.  

Debt Relief, student loan debt, Student Loans

Student Loan Changes on the Horizon in 2021

Changes are on the horizon for student loans in 2021. Student loan reform has been an issue discussed for years, if not decades, but several events that occurred in 2020 have pushed the issue to the forefront. The presidential election, the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, and the current economic climate have all pushed lawmakers to realize that student loan reform is a very real issue, and one that requires immediate action. The following possible changes could be coming in the new year.  

Student Loan Cancellation 

A number of recent legislative proposals have brought up the idea of student loan forgiveness. One proposal was included in the Heroes Act stimulus package proposed by House Democrats. In the legislation, lawmakers proposed to cancel up to $10,000 in student loan debt for borrowers who could demonstrate that they were struggling financially. Unfortunately, even though the legislation moved forward to the Senate, this portion of the original bill was removed. Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Chuck Schumer (D-MA) have proposed legislation that would cancel $50,000 in student loan debt for borrowers who earn less than $125,000 in annual income. Lawmakers have pushed on President Elect Joe Biden to make a statement as to whether he supports or does not support student loan cancellation. Biden has stated that he would not likely pursue an executive order to cancel student loans, but rather, he encouraged Congress to consider immediate cancellation of $10,000 of student loans across the board. However, the fate of this proposal hinges on whether Republicans will retain control over the Senate. If they do, it is unlikely that student loan cancellation will move forward. 

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Debt Relief

Floridians Hope to Receive Relief from Second Round of Stimulus Payments

As coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to affect the economy, many have been wondering when another relief package would be passed by Congress. After the CARES Act was passed in March 2020, providing the first source of stimulus payments, consumers have been anticipating a second source of stimulus payments to help during their continuing financial struggles. Fortunately, at the end of December 2020, a second stimulus relief package was passed by Congress and signed by the President, providing them with a sense of reprieve.

As compared the $2 trillion CARES Act passed last March, this second package totals $900 billion. Additionally, while the previous package provided $1,200 per taxpayer, this new bill provides $600 per individual making less than $75,000 annually. The new legislation provides $600 per child, while the previous legislation provided $100 less per child.  

Debt Relief, Financial Advice, Kingcade Garcia McMaken

Make a Resolution to Eliminate Your Debt in the New Year

Some of the most common New Year’s resolutions involve improving one’s physical health through diet and exercise, cutting out bad habits, and losing weight.  Other popular New Year’s resolutions involve improving one’s financial health, getting finances in order, and eliminating debt.

The unexpected turn of events caused by the pandemic have been far-reaching. Job loss, medical expenses, the inability to pay bills, rent, and credit card debt are at the forefront of concerns for many South Florida residents.

For those dealing with concerns about their financial situation and are worried about foreclosure and repossession, there are options available including bankruptcy. When you gain control over your debt, you gain control over your life.

Coronavirus, Debt Relief

Mortgage Debt Reaches Record High of $10 Trillion

The American housing market is booming, even though various aspects of the nation’s economy are struggling due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  During the last quarter of 2020, the nation’s mortgage debt load reached a record high of $10 trillion, according to figures from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Low interest rates for home mortgages is a big catalyst for this boom in the housing market.  

Consumers are taking advantage of record low interest rates when making home purchases. At the start of November 2020, mortgage rates reached a 12th record low in 2020.  As a result, mortgage debt jumped by $85 billion between July and September 2020, reaching a high of $9.86 trillion.  

Credit Card Debt, Debt Relief

Average American Consumer Carries over $90,000 in Debt

Most American consumers carry some form of debt. In fact, debt has become a way of life for many Americans. Whenever a big purchase needs to be made, consumers will often apply for financing to pay for this purchase. This can include items like a home, car, furniture, or even for basic purchases.  

According to data from the credit agency, Experian, as of 2019, the average American consumer has $90,460 in debt from various sources, including mortgages, student loan debt, personal loans and credit cards. Escaping this debt load can be tricky, and Experian’s data shows that certain generations struggle more than others when handling consumer debt. 

Debt Relief

How To Ensure Student Loan Debt Does Not Prevent You From Getting a Mortgage

With the cost of attending a university rising each year, more students are taking out student loans to pay for their education.  According to statistics from the Federal Reserve and New York Federal Reserve, more than 44 million American consumers owe a collective $1.6 trillion in student loan debt. Student borrowers oftentimes graduate with up to six figures in student loan debt. Certain steps can be taken to ensure that student loans do not prevent young adults from reaching important milestones, like homeownership.   

Income-to-Debt Ratio 

When being approved for a mortgage, the borrower’s income-to-debt ratio is an important figure considered by potential lenders. Two different ratios are used by potential lenders. One of them is called a front-end ratio, which looks at the loan applicant’s expected mortgage in comparison to his or her monthly income. The second ratio is called the back-end ratio. This figure reviews the applicant’s monthly expenses, including housing costs, car payments, student loan payments, and other monthly expenses, in comparison to the person’s monthly income. If the borrower’s debt far outweighs his or her income, it is unlikely that person will be approved for a mortgage. However, certain steps can be taken to help boost that ratio. If the potential borrower is carrying a high credit card balance, by paying that balance down, he or she can help boost chances of being approved for a mortgage. If the borrower can pay down the balance in full every month, then that debt will not even factor into his or her debt-to-income ratio.