COVID-19, Debt Relief, Foreclosures

Biden Extends Ban on Evictions and Foreclosures through March

Shortly after being sworn in as the nation’s 46th president, Joe Biden signed several executive orders. One of these signed orders included extending the ban on evictions and foreclosures for individuals affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

This new order extends the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) moratorium that was set to expire on January 31, 2021. The CDC’s order first went into effect in September 2020. This new executive order extends the ban for at least an additional two months past the expiration date.

A staggering 25 million homeowners and renters are said to be at risk of losing their homes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. President Biden’s orders were meant to demonstrate how seriously the administration takes the COVID-19 pandemic and the effect it has had on all Americans by taking immediate action to help.

President Biden asked several departments, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Agriculture, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, to also extend foreclosure moratoriums for federally backed mortgages through the end of March, and to also accept applications for forbearance on federally guaranteed mortgages, as well.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) had extended its moratoriums on foreclosures and evictions through the rest of February as of Tuesday, but the President also asked that this period be extended through the end of March. Any entities servicing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guaranteed loans were also encouraged to continue accepting applications for mortgage forbearance.

According to figures from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, an estimated 14 million adults currently living in rental housing were behind on their rent payments as of December 2020. This figure comes out to one in every five renters being behind on their rent. In addition, 11.8 million adults are reported being behind on their mortgage payments.

President Biden’s executive order is meant to give some immediate protection for these individuals, but it may not be enough. He has also asked Congress to approve a COVID relief bill that would provide further relief, including $35 billion in rent and utility assistance. This $35 billion would be in addition to the $25 billion in rent relief that was included in the stimulus package passed in December 2020.

Please click here to read more.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between keeping your home or losing it in foreclosure. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure, please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at  www.miamibankruptcy.com.

COVID-19, Foreclosures, Kingcade Garcia McMaken

Evictions Pile Up as DeSantis’ Moratorium Set to Expire in Florida

Both landlords and tenants are waiting with bated breath to see what will happen when it comes to the current moratorium on evictions in Florida. With the hold on evictions set to expire at the end of this month, no official statement has come from the Florida Governor’s office regarding whether Gov. Ron DeSantis intends to extend the moratorium through the end of September. In the meantime, the number of eviction cases are piling up, waiting to proceed once the freeze on evictions is lifted.

The moratorium on evictions related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic originally took effect on April 2, during the height of the epidemic. As the hold on evictions now enters its fifth month, landlords are demanding the stay be lifted, allowing them to proceed with business, while tenants are requesting the hold on evictions be extended, giving them additional breathing room to get back on their feet during this difficult time. However, many landlords argue that the individuals taking use of this moratorium do not actually need the assistance but are simply taking advantage of the statewide ban.

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Governor DeSantis Issues Amended Executive Order on Foreclosures and Evictions

The statewide moratorium on evictions and foreclosures during the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis has been extended via an executive order issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis. However, critics are questioning the language within the order itself as to just what it means for Florida residents facing evictions or foreclosures.

The executive order was signed and announced on July 29. However, the amended language in this new executive order does not prevent all evictions and foreclosures like the previous one did.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Florida Homeowners Struggle to Pay PACE Home Improvement Loans

Florida homeowners who have financed home improvements through help of an energy loan program are now struggling to pay back those debts. The program, named Property Assessed Cleaning Energy, also known as PACE, is a financing program used to fund improvements to property owner’s homes in Florida over the past three years.

PACE is offered only in three states throughout the country. For some South Floridians, the PACE program has been a blessing, but it has unfortunately ended up being more of a curse for many of them as they struggle to pay back their loans. This money meant the ability to install a new roof, solar energy systems, an air conditioning system or even hurricane-resistant impact windows. Through PACE, all of this would be financed with nothing down and no credit check. The applicant simply would need to show that he or she had equity in the home, had a good history of making mortgage payments on time, and could show that he or she had enough money to make payments on the PACE loan.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Mortgage Foreclosure and Eviction Relief Extended by Governor DeSantis

The order issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis offering Floridians facing eviction or foreclosure relief has been extended through July 1, 2020. The order was issued at the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic to help individuals facing financial stress. Given that the economic fall-out from COVID-19 is ongoing, Governor DeSantis has extended this relief into mid-summer.

This news comes at a good time, as unemployment is still at a record high. Florida’s unemployment system has still been failing many who have applied for benefits. Thousands of individuals are still waiting to receive their unemployment so that they can pay necessary living expenses, arguably the most important of these being rent and mortgage bills.

Foreclosure Defense, Foreclosures

Foreclosure Rates in U.S. Dip to a 20-Year Low

 The national foreclosure rate has fallen to the lowest levels seen in two decades following housing reports from July 2019. Financial experts believe this drop is due to a stronger job market and a lower unemployment rate.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national unemployment rate fell to a 50-year low of 3.5 percent as of September 2019 with 136,000 jobs being added to the market. In addition, the hourly earning for all employees has gone up 2.9 percent from the prior year. As Americans have more money to spend, the chances of them falling short of meeting their monthly expenses also goes down.

Foreclosures

Reverse Mortgages: Thousands of Florida Homeowners at Risk of Foreclosure

Thousands of Florida seniors are facing foreclosure, even homelessness due to being stuck in reverse mortgages now going into foreclosure. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), nearly 15,000 Florida seniors out of the 85,000 currently holding reverse mortgages are at risk of losing their homes.

A reverse mortgage is also often referred to as a home-equity conversion mortgage. Reverse mortgage lenders normally target individuals over the age of 62 who are living in homes with larger amounts of equity. The reverse mortgage allows the homeowner to borrow against the equity in his or her home. Instead of monthly mortgage payments, the balance only becomes due when the borrower dies, moves away from the home permanently or sells the home.

Foreclosures

Facing Foreclosure? Here’s When You Actually Have to Move Out in Florida.

When someone receives a foreclosure notice, the first thought that often comes to that person’s mind is the fear of losing their home. A foreclosure notice does not mean that someone is automatically out of his or her home. As a homeowner in Florida, you have rights. It is important that any person in this situation understands clearly what those rights are.

Understanding the Timing

A notice of foreclosure does not mean that it will happen immediately. The homeowner has the legal right to remain in the home until the lender successfully completes all foreclosure procedures and sells the home, which can take several months, depending on the circumstances involved.

Foreclosures

Seniors Targeted Through Reverse Mortgages Now Face Foreclosure

An alarming trend is emerging when it comes to foreclosures among the senior population. A number of them have been the victims of reverse mortgage schemes resulting in their homes being foreclosed on.  Consumers 62 years of age and older face a unique set of financial difficulties- one of their main concerns is servicing issues with reverse mortgages, according to the Monthly Complaint Report released by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Reverse mortgages allow the homeowner to borrow against the value of their home, receiving money through a lump sum, a fixed monthly credit or line of credit. However, a reverse mortgage does not require the individual to make any loan payments. Instead, the entire balance becomes due when the borrower either dies, moves away permanently or sells the home.

The problem with reverse mortgages is they can be quite expensive and complex if you need to get out of one. Additionally, many lenders put themselves out there as reputable reverse mortgage service providers while offering what are essentially scams to homeowners.

For the most part, the reverse mortgages that elderly homeowners are struggling with come from more than a decade ago when the recession first hit. All it takes is for the homeowner to miss one simple deadline or to fall behind on homeowner’s insurance payments or taxes before the lender moves into foreclose on the home.

Elderly homeowners who are at or below the poverty line and are living in urban areas, have been hit the hardest. USA Today recently published a story regarding reverse mortgages and the effects they have had on the aging population. Their study showed a notable disparity and a trend that subprime lenders tend to target certain areas where the loans are almost always doomed to fail, including fixed incomes and lower income areas.

Miami is one of the cities that has been hit the hardest. Not only does the Miami metropolitan area have pockets of neighborhoods where the population falls below the poverty guideline, it is also an area where many seniors come to retire.

Click here to read more.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

Related Resource: https://www.investopedia.com/mortgage/reverse-mortgage/

 

Foreclosures

Florida Sees a Sharp Increase in Foreclosures

While the nation is seeing a drop in the number of foreclosures, Florida is seeing the opposite. For the 12th month in a row, Florida has seen a double-digit annual increase in foreclosure filings.

These figures come from a study published by ATTOM Data Solutions, which reviewed foreclosure starts from May 2018, comparing these figures to those reported in May 2019. On a national scale, foreclosure filings were down nine percent when compared to figures from May 2018. Florida, on the other hand, saw an increase in foreclosure starts of 23 percent when compared to the previous year.

As of May 1, 2019, one in every 1,238 homes had a foreclosure filing in Florida. These numbers are the third highest in the country, behind New Jersey and Maryland. Of the metropolitan areas in Florida, Jacksonville reported the second highest foreclosure rate, reporting that one in every 764 homes were involved in some stage of foreclosure proceedings.

Since January 2019, these numbers have been increasing incrementally. One of the contributing factors for these high foreclosure numbers has to do with the fact that while the cost of living in Florida has gone up, wages have stayed stagnant for several years. Not only have the cost of purchasing a home gone up, but so have insurances and taxes that come with owning a home.

Other factors leading to higher foreclosure rates could have to do with natural disasters that hit the sunshine state more than others, namely hurricanes. Depending on the severity of the storm, homeowners could lose their jobs or even their homes after a hurricane. Insurance can also skyrocket following a natural disaster, also making it difficult for the person to maintain payments on the home.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

https://miami.cbslocal.com/2019/06/17/florida-bucks-trend-sees-increases-in-foreclosures/