student loan debt, Student Loans

4 Student Loan Relief Measures that should be Implemented if Payment Pause Is Not Extended

It remains unclear whether the student loan repayment pause will be extended by President Biden. Two primary economic concerns urge the delay of payments past Feb. 1: Rising Omicron cases could jeopardize workers’ return to work, and given the pandemic-exacerbated racial disparities, borrowers of color will face ‘undue hardship’ if payments are restarted too soon.

If that’s the case, the organizations recommend four additional protections for student loan borrowers:

  1. Continue to waive interest for all borrowers;
  2. Return all borrowers in default on their debt to good standing to avoid financial penalties;
  3. Ensure all borrowers are aware of the process to apply for an income-driven repayment plan;
  4. Announce and implement provisions, like offering a grace period to prevent borrowers from immediately becoming delinquent on their debt.
student loan debt, Student Loans

First Wave of Public Servants Awarded Student Loan Forgiveness Through Temporary Program

The Biden administration recently announced the introduction of a temporary expansion of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. The program cancels outstanding student debt for public servants.

In order to be eligible, debt holders must have made 120 payments toward their federal student debt on-time for at least 10 years. The loans must have been made through the federal government and payments must have been made through repayment plans, most of which are based upon income. They must also work for the government or one of the non-profit organizations specified by the program. Many teachers, public defenders, Peace Corps workers, and law enforcement officers may qualify for forgiveness.

student loan debt, Student Loans

Heavily Redacted White House Memo Released Regarding Student Loan Forgiveness

The White House recently released a memo about canceling debt for federal student loan borrowers, but the text was heavily redacted. This seven-page memo, dated April 5, 2021, was addressed to the U.S. Secretary of Education in consideration of potential student loan forgiveness by the Biden Administration. This memorandum, although heavily redacted, gives some insight into whether the administration has the authority to issue widespread student loan forgiveness.

student loan debt, Student Loans

Biden Administration Cancels Almost $10 Billion in Student Loan Debt. Who Got Relief?

In total, the Department of Education has approved discharging $8.7 billion in student loan debt for more than 450,000 borrowers.

Click here to see if you are eligible.

That amount has included:

  • $7.1 billion for borrowers who were eligible for relief because of “total and permanent disability.”
  • $55.6 million in loan discharges for students who attended three trade schools that officials said misrepresented themselves to students.
  • Another $1 billion for other students defrauded by their schools.

The Biden Administration has cancelled nearly $10 billion in student loan debt since January 2021, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The Department reported they have approved $9.5 billion in student loan discharges since January 2021, affecting approximately 563,000 borrowers.  This has given borrowers the ability to tackle other debts, invest and increase savings.

student loan debt, Student Loans

Student Loan Payment Pause Extended to 2022

The Biden administration has announced that the moratorium on federal student loan payments would be extended through January 31, 2022. This announcement came just over a month before the pause was set to expire at the end of September. According to the Department of Education, this extension is the final one that will be issued.

The moratorium was first put in place in March 2020 after Congress passed the CARES Act. The moratorium paused payments through the end of September 2020, keeping all federal student loan interest rates at zero percent, affecting approximately 42 million federal borrowers. President Trump then issued an executive order to extend the student loan payment pause through January 2021. As soon as President Biden took office, he issued another executive order extending the pause through September 30, 2021.

Please click here to read more.

student loan debt, Student Loans

Biden Administration Cancels Additional $55.6 Million in Student Loan Debt

The Biden Administration canceled an additional $55.6 million in student loans for 1,800 students who were found to be victims of fraud. This additional amount brings the total amount of student loan debt cancelled by the Biden administration to $1.5 trillion. 

Since entering office, President Biden has made it his mission to stand up for the thousands of students who were taken advantage of by for-profit colleges. This most recent effort was focused on students who attended Westwood College, Marinello Schools of Beauty, and the Court Reporting Institute. Previously, the administration had approved loan forgiveness for students who attended ITT Technical Institute, the American Career Institute and Corinthian College. This is the first time the Department of Education has approved loan forgiveness for students attending for-profit schools not including these three.  

student loan debt, Student Loans

What $10,000 in Student Loan Cancellation Would Look Like

Lawmakers have been calling upon President Biden to move forward with an executive order that would cancel up to $50,000 in federally backed student loan debtOther amounts have been considered, the lowest amount being $10,000. How this cancellation would look across the country would vary, however, depending on the state and the borrower.  

According to the Student Loan Hero, $10,000 in student loan forgiveness would cost approximately $315 billion. This amount of loan forgiveness would erase outstanding student loan balances for 34 percent of all student loan borrowers, according to their review of Department of Education data.  

student loan debt, Student Loans

Beware of this Student Loan Debt Relief Scam in 2021

Student loan borrowers look for ways to save on their loan payments, including having their loans forgiven. However, for the 10 million student loan borrowers who were part of the recent Navient settlement, they now find themselves at risk of falling prey to a new scam.  

This recent Navient settlement came as part of a student loan forgiveness lawsuit. Navient is one of the country’s largest student loan providers, and while the settlement does not necessarily affect how much each borrower owes, scammers are targeting borrowers, by offering false claims of debt forgiveness.  

Coronavirus, COVID-19, Debt Relief, student loan debt

New Legislation Provides Student Loan Forgiveness to Frontline Healthcare Workers

Healthcare workers on the frontlines are putting their lives at risk every day during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, which has many asking what can be done to financially help these dedicated individuals.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) plans to introduce new legislation that will do just that by forgiving outstanding student loan debt carried by these frontline healthcare workers. The legislation is titled The Student Debt Forgiveness for Frontline Health Care Workers Act. The hope behind this new legislation is that by forgiving student loan debt for these workers, a large financial burden will be lifted. Additionally, this incentive could possibly drive others to join the healthcare industry and continue the fight against COVID-19.

Debt Relief, student loan debt, Student Loans

An Alarming Number of Student Borrowers Have Made No Progress on their Loan Balances

A disturbing number of student loan borrowers who began their repayment plans between 2010 and 2012 have made little to no progress towards reducing the principal balance owed on their student loans. According to a recent report from Moody’s Investor Services, 49 percent of student loan borrowers whose loan repayment plans began during that time have made no progress. Even worse, many of them have seen their balances grow.

This problem could be due to several factors, including poor job prospects and low salaries in their first jobs after graduation. Depending on the degree pursued by each borrower, it can be difficult, if not impossible, to find a viable job that will allow the borrower to make appropriate payments to pay down their student loan debt.