Posts Tagged: ‘Tax Return’

9 Common Tax Errors People Make

March 24, 2017 Posted by kingcade

Small errors on your tax return can cost you big time. If you want to get your tax refund as quickly as possible and avoid fines, don’t make these nine common errors.

  1. Wrong or Missing Social Security Numbers. All of the tax information that gets reported to the IRS is tied to your Social Security number. As a result, if you provide the wrong number, the IRS will not be able to match up your return with the information that your employer and financial institutions have provided.
  2. Wrong Names. The IRS receives many returns on which people’s names are incorrect. Double check your Social Security card to ensure you are providing your legal name.
  3. Filing Status Errors. Some filing statuses can give additional tax breaks, but it is critical to choose the right one for your particular situation. Often, taxpayers make mistakes in choosing a filing status for which they don’t qualify, such as, head of household for unmarried individuals.
  4. Math Errors. Tax software typically catches math errors; however, if you make a simple data-entry mistake, your numbers will still be off. Double check everything with a calculator to avoid this problem.
  5. Errors in Figuring Credits or Deductions. Some tax breaks are complicated and the IRS says that errors in figuring the earned income tax credit, child and dependent care credit and the standard deduction are particularly common. The best way to avoid these errors is to follow instructions carefully in calculating these credits and deductions.
  6. Incorrect Bank Account Numbers. If you use direct deposit to get your refund, make sure you have provided the correct routing number and account number. If you don’t, your refund won’t get processed correctly.
  7. Not signing or dating your tax forms. It is easy to forget one of these key final steps after spending hours or days preparing your return. However, an unsigned tax return is not valid. Also, if you are filing a joint return, both spouses have to sign.
  8. Errors with validating an electronically filed tax return. If you file electronically, you have to select a personal identification number to use to validate your return. Often, taxpayers do not understand the procedure or fail to provide the correct number.
  9. Not Correcting Erroneous Tax Information Forms. If there are errors on your W-2 form from your employer or on your 1099 forms from financial institutions, you should not ignore them. Rather, talk to the reporting party and ask them to correct the error. Otherwise, the IRS will flag a mismatch between what you filed and what the other party filed and it will be up to you to prove you are right.

 

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If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com

What Happens to Tax Debt in Bankruptcy?

January 26, 2017 Posted by kingcade

If you are considering filing for bankruptcy, you may be wondering if your tax debts can be discharged in bankruptcy court. Although the automatic stay will delay the IRS from contacting you about your debts, there are some taxes that cannot be eliminated in bankruptcy court. Here are three basic rules that will tell you if your tax debts are eligible for discharge.

  1. The Three Year Rule. Your tax debts must be three years old from the date they were due, not from the date that you filed. Tax returns are due on April 15th each year. This means that your 2010 taxes are not eligible for discharge until April 15th of 2014. This is because your 2010 taxes were technically due in April 2011. Calculate three years from the time the taxes were due.
  2. Your Tax Returns Must Have Been Filed for Two Years Before Bankruptcy. Taxes must be filed for two years prior to the bankruptcy filing to prevent delinquent taxpayers from filing late returns one day and bankruptcy the next.
  3. The Taxes Must Have Been Assessed More Than 240 Days Ago. The IRS must formally determine that you owe the taxes you are trying to eliminate in bankruptcy more than 240 days before you file the paperwork with the court. Note that an offer in compromise will delay the 240-day rule while it is pending plus an additional 30 days.

If you are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.natlbankruptcy.com/bankruptcy-and-tax-debt-what-happens-to-tax-debt-in-bankruptcy/

http://www.thebankruptcysite.org/resources/bankruptcy/stop-irs-collecting-tax-debts.htm#

7 IMPORTANT Items to Check before Filing your Taxes

April 10, 2013 Posted by kingcade

Even if you have hired a “tax pro” to file your tax return this year, it is important that you double or even triple-check your tax return before sending it in. If there are errors on your tax return, you will be held responsible by the IRS. When you sign your tax return, there are words over your signature stating that by signing, you declare to have examined the return and that all facts on the return are true. Therefore, you are responsible for what is on those pages, even if your tax preparer has committed fraud on your behalf; you will be the one to pay for it.

Below are 7 items to mark off your checklist before filing your tax return:

1. Names: Be sure that all names listed on your tax return match those on the Social Security cards. The IRS cross-references all names on tax returns. In some cases, the name on your social security card might actually be wrong or misspelled. If this has happened to you, you still need to match the name you file with to the one on your Social Security card.

2. ID Numbers: Verify any persons’ Social Security number with those on their Social Security cards. It is best not to rely on your memory when filing your tax return, particularly when filling out your spouse or child’s number. You also need to verify taxpayer ID numbers used on any business schedules.

3. Form 1040: If you are filing a 1040, make sure you look over the bottom area of page one. There may be numbers you do not understand or contributions that you know you did not make. Make sure that there is no amount listed under the alimony section unless you make alimony payments.

4. Deductions: If you are over the age of 65 or blind, make sure you have checked those boxes on your tax return. These steps will increase your standard deductions. Also, double-check your medical or business expenses. Some fraudsters use the national averages the IRS publishes each year to make up false amounts on your behalf.

5. Credits: Refundable tax credits are common areas of tax abuse and fraud. This can be done using Child Tax Credits, Earned Income Credits or Education credits. These are credits for which the IRS refunds you, although you have not actually paid any taxes. Some tax preparers make up false information to get refunds, even if you do not have children.

6. Withholding: Make sure this section of your tax return shows the correct amount. A common mistake for tax preparers is to enter the Social Security withheld into this field.

7. Refunds: If you make a mistake on your routing number or account number for a direct deposit, you are out of luck. If someone else gets your refund due to your mistake, the IRS can do nothing to help you. Experts say you should triple check this information before filing.

Click here to read more on the 7 items to mark off your checklist before filing your tax return.

If you are in a financial crisis and are considering filing bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

When Should I File my Tax Return if I plan to File Bankruptcy and Anticipate a Tax Refund?

April 8, 2013 Posted by kingcade

Oftentimes, bankruptcy filers worry that if they file their taxes before their bankruptcy petition, they will be forced to forfeit their tax refund to the bankruptcy court or creditors. According to bankruptcy laws, debtors must be current on all tax filing obligations to federal and state taxing authorities in order to file for bankruptcy. This rule applies to income taxes, personal property taxes, real property taxes and all other forms of taxes. The best course of action for potential bankruptcy filers is to file their taxes as far in advance of the bankruptcy filing as possible. As long as you obtain your tax refund and spend it on household expenses, car or home repairs, medical expenses, etc. prior to filing for bankruptcy, the court cannot require you to forfeit the refund. This is true regardless of the amount you receive in your refund.

In the event that your refund is due after bankruptcy has been filed, your refund is subject to state or federal exemption limits. If the debtor elects to use federal exemption amounts or the state’s exemption schedules, the refund may be retained by the debtor and is outside the grasp of the bankruptcy court and creditors. It might also be within partial or total reach of creditors if exemptions are exhausted by the debtor’s other claimed property. The most common occurrence is one where the debtor would retain part of the refund and part of it would go to the creditors because the exemption amount is exceeded by the size of the refund. Again, the best thing to do is file your tax return as quickly as possible to avoid losing any of it. A debtor can also apply part or all of the refund to next year’s tax liability to avoid losing it to creditors.

Click here to read more about the best time to file your tax return if you are considering filing for bankruptcy protection.

If you are in a financial crisis and are considering filing bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

6 Steps to Prep for your Tax Return

January 28, 2013 Posted by kingcade

Below are six steps to help you get ahead on your taxes this year:

1. The first thing you should do is put together a list of social security numbers. You will need to include everyone’s number who will be on your tax return. If your child is 12 years old or older and does not have a social security number, you must apply for one.

2. Next, you will need to gather the documents that show the income you earned in 2012. This can include: a W-2 from your employer, a 1099-MISC if you made more than $600 from anyone for freelance work, a 1099-G if you collected unemployment, the interest on any savings accounts you have, etc.

3. You also need to locate your 2011 tax return. This can be very helpful when filing your 2012 tax return, unless your life has drastically changed. If you cannot find your tax return from last year, you can order a copy at http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/Order-a-Transcript.

4. Another step you can take to get ahead on your taxes is to figure out the deductions you can claim. There are many possibilities with tax deductions, therefore you should educate yourself and get your paperwork together, early. You will need documentation to prove any deductions you claim. Visit http://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc500.html to learn about deductions.

5. If you contributed to a charitable organization in 2012, you can deduct your donation from your taxes. The donation can be in the form of cash, property or stock and must have been to an organization, not a person or political campaign. Visit http://www.irs.gov/uac/Eight-Tips-for-Deducting-Charitable-Contributions to learn about charitable deductions.

6. Finally, you should plan your actual refund. The fastest way to get your refund is to file electronically and use direct deposit.

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If you are in a financial crisis and are considering filing bankruptcy, contact an experienced attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. at www.miamibankruptcy.com.