Foreclosures, Timothy Kingcade Posts

5 Steps to Slow Down the Foreclosure Process in Florida

Receiving a notice of delinquency in the mail does not automatically mean that you are going to lose your home. Florida has what is called a judicial foreclosure process, which means that every homeowner is entitled to a hearing before the court to determine whether or not the bank is entitled to foreclose.  The most important thing to remember is that the homeowner has rights. There are things you can do to slow down the foreclosure process and even keep your home, while getting your financial life back on track.

  1. Educate yourself. Read over everything you have received from the lender, including the mortgage itself. Many notices will contain information on foreclosure prevention options. It is only after you have not paid your mortgage for a period of 90 days that foreclosure proceedings will start.  Remember, Florida is a judicial foreclosure state, meaning the lender must file a lawsuit against you before moving forward with the proceedings.
  2. Contact your lender. The lender will likely be willing to work with you as the foreclosure process can be lengthy and costly in Florida. There are different options they may extend to you, which include: refinancing, a repayment plan, forbearance or a loan modification.
  3. Contact a HUD approved housing counselor. There are federally funded agencies in each state that work with a variety of lenders to secure affordable repayment options for struggling homeowners. But with this option, beware that there are many non-legitimate companies looking to scam borrowers.  Research these options carefully and use caution. Make sure you are working with a free, federally approved agency.
  4. Consider doing a short sale. If you do not see yourself being able to repay your mortgage with a loan modification or repayment plan, a short sale may be a good option.
  5. Consider filing for bankruptcy. Filing for bankruptcy will not only eliminate your unsecured debt, but as soon as you file for bankruptcy an “automatic stay” goes into effect, which stops all collection attempts and halts the foreclosure process.

Click HERE to read more on this story.

Choosing the right attorney can make the difference between whether or not you can keep your home. A well-qualified Miami foreclosure defense attorney will not only help you keep your home, but they will be able to negotiate a loan that has payments you can afford. Miami foreclosure defense attorney Timothy Kingcade has helped many facing foreclosure alleviate their stress by letting them stay in their homes for at least another year, allowing them to re-organize their lives. If you have any questions on the topic of foreclosure please feel free to contact me at (305) 285-9100. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Protections of the Bankruptcy Automatic Stay

One of the best tools available to bankruptcy filers is the automatic stay. When a person files for bankruptcy, the court will issue an order called an automatic stay. This puts an immediate stop to collection attempts, creditor harassment, along with any civil lawsuits filed against the person pursuing bankruptcy.

The automatic stay also provides some much-needed relief to filers who are likely facing a number of different stressors and collection actions at once. It allows the person to be freed from those conflicts so that he or she can work with the bankruptcy trustee on the best method to deal with creditors.

Benefits of the Automatic Stay

Many times, someone going through a difficult financial situation may find himself or herself at the point where he or she is on the brink of losing the most basic of living necessities. If someone is behind on their utility bill and could potentially lose water, electric or gas, the automatic stay will give that person an additional number of days to work out the situation and hopefully avoid their utility from being shut off.

The same applies for someone facing foreclosure. The automatic stay will put an immediate halt to the proceedings. If the filer rents his or her home and is facing eviction proceedings, the automatic stay may also provide some temporary relief. If the person’s landlord already has a judgment of possession against the renter when bankruptcy is filed, however, the automatic stay will not be able to help him or her from being evicted. If it has not gotten to that point in the eviction proceeding, the automatic stay will be able to put a temporary halt to the eviction so that the person can figure out his or her next step rather than being tossed out immediately.

Many filers also find themselves facing wage garnishment by the time they decide to file for bankruptcy. A bankruptcy petition will put a stop to most garnishments, although not all, specifically child support or alimony.  Other garnishments for debts that would be able to be discharged in bankruptcy, such as personal loans or credit card debt, can be stopped and will likely end up being discharged at the end of the proceedings.

The key with an automatic stay is it provides relief to the filer who is likely feeling a great deal of stress at the time of filing. As a consumer, you have rights if the creditor does not follow the proper procedure and violates the automatic stay. Any violation should be immediately reported to your attorney, as well as the bankruptcy court. Depending on the violation and the behavior of the creditor, he or she may face fines, and severe penalties for the violation.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Source: https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/how-bankruptcy-stops-creditors-automatic-29723.html

 

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

How Much Debt Is Required To Qualify for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

One of the common misconceptions surrounding bankruptcy has to do with how much debt you must have to qualify for bankruptcy. Bankruptcy laws do not have a set minimum debt requirement for someone to be able to file for bankruptcy. Ultimately, it depends largely on the person’s financial circumstances, including the type of debt he or she has, as well as the person’s ability to pay back the debt, along with other factors.

When it comes to debt levels, how much debt you have is only one consideration made when determining whether you should proceed with a bankruptcy filing.  Unlike a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy does have a maximum debt amount for debtors considering this form of bankruptcy. While there is no minimum debt amount required to file for bankruptcy, you cannot have more than $1,257,850 in secured debt or $419,275 in unsecured debt if you want to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy (these amounts, which are adjusted periodically to account for inflation, are valid as of April 2019).

Filers are limited in how many times they can receive a bankruptcy discharge within a set amount of time. For example, if you filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and received a discharge, you must wait eight years before being able to file for Chapter 7 again. Therefore, if you do not have a significant amount of debt, you may want to consider whether you will anticipate needing to file in the future. Is it worth it to file for bankruptcy now on a smaller amount of debt and be barred from filing again, if needed? A bankruptcy attorney can talk through these options with you to help you make the best choice.

Bankruptcy looks at the different types of debts you carry and whether these debts can be discharged. Certain debts are considered non-dischargeable, including priority tax debtsstudent loans in most cases, child support, spousal support, and any obligations arising from a personal injury case caused by wrong actions, which can include drunk driving. For instance, if most of your debt is in student loans, a bankruptcy may not be your best option, while a person who carries mostly credit card and medical debt will find bankruptcy beneficial.

If you are filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Florida, you can use Florida bankruptcy exemptions to protect your property. In addition, residents are provided unlimited exemptions for homestead, annuities, and the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy. Florida has one of the most generous homestead exemptions in the country.

Even if you do not have a large amount of debt, if you are being sued or the matter is being referred to collections, it may be best to file for bankruptcy now instead of later. As soon as you file for bankruptcy, an automatic stay will be issued, putting a stop to all collection actions. If you wait too long, and a judgment is issued on the debt, resulting in wage garnishment, it may be too little too late. It is for this reason that it is important you meet with an experienced bankruptcy attorney to talk about your financial situation and whether bankruptcy is right for you.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Source: AllLaw.com

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Credit Card Debt, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Do you have enough debt to file for bankruptcy?

One of the common misconceptions surrounding bankruptcy has to do with how much debt you must have to qualify for bankruptcy. Bankruptcy laws do not have a set minimum debt requirement for someone to be able to file for bankruptcy. Ultimately, it depends largely on the person’s financial circumstances, including the type of debt he or she has, as well as the person’s ability to pay back the debt, along with other factors.

When it comes to debt levels, how much debt you have is only one consideration made when determining whether you should proceed with a bankruptcy filing.  Unlike a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy does have a maximum debt amount for debtors considering this form of bankruptcy. Currently, you cannot hold more than $1,184,200 in secured debt or $394,725 in unsecured debt when filing a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case. These numbers do fluctuate depending on inflation and can change from year-to-year.

Filers are limited in how many times they can receive a bankruptcy discharge within a set amount of time. For example, if you filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and received a discharge, you must wait eight years before being able to file for Chapter 7 again. Therefore, if you do not have a significant amount of debt, you may want to consider whether you will anticipate needing to file in the future. Is it worth it to file for bankruptcy now on a smaller amount of debt and be barred from filing again, if needed? A bankruptcy attorney can talk through these options with you to help you make the best choice.

Bankruptcy looks at the different types of debts you carry and whether these debts can be discharged. Certain debts are considered non-dischargeable, including priority tax debts, student loans in most cases, child support, spousal support, and any obligations arising from a personal injury case caused by wrong actions, which can include drunk driving. For instance, if most of your debt is in student loans, a bankruptcy may not be your best option, while a person who carries mostly credit card and medical debt will find bankruptcy beneficial.

If you are filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Florida, you can use Florida bankruptcy exemptions to protect your property. In addition, residents are provided unlimited exemptions for homestead, annuities, and the cash surrender value of a life insurance policy. Florida has one of the most generous homestead exemptions in the country.

Even if you do not have a large amount of debt, if you are being sued or the matter is being referred to collections, it may be best to file for bankruptcy now instead of later. As soon as you file for bankruptcy, an automatic stay will be issued, putting a stop to all collection actions. If you wait too long, and a judgment is issued on the debt, resulting in wage garnishment, it may be too little too late. It is for this reason that it is important you meet with an experienced bankruptcy attorney to talk about your financial situation and whether bankruptcy is right for you.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources: https://www.alllaw.com/articles/nolo/bankruptcy/do-i-have-enough-debt-to-file-for-bankruptcy.html

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Foreclosures, Timothy Kingcade Posts

If you are facing foreclosure, Bankruptcy can help.

Every month, there are a number of Americans who fall behind on their mortgage payments. Some homeowners are able to work out loan modifications with their lenders, but many are not. It may seem counter-intuitive, but when someone is facing foreclosure and is in the middle of a major financial crisis, bankruptcy can be a viable option to help save that person’s home. Ultimately, it depends on your specific financial situation and the type of bankruptcy you file – but bankruptcy can be used as a tool to help keep your home.

The Power of the Automatic Stay

If your home is already set for a foreclosure sale, you may be asking, “how can I make it stop?” Filing for bankruptcy can put a stop to the process or at the very least postpone it. As soon as a petition for bankruptcy is filed, the court issues an order called an “automatic stay,” which puts an immediate halt to all collection activities that were happening to the homeowner before the petition was filed. This automatic stay also applies to foreclosure cases.  Creditors (including your mortgage lender) must immediately cease collection attempts. Even if the mortgage lender has the home scheduled for a foreclosure sale, the sale will be postponed during a pending bankruptcy.

How a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy can Help:

Chapter 7 bankruptcy cancels all the debt secured by the home, including mortgages and home equity loans. This type of bankruptcy also goes a step further, thanks to a new law, Chapter 7 also forgives the homeowner for tax liability for losses the mortgage or home-improvement lender incurs because of the homeowner’s default.

How a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy can Help:

If you want to stay in your home and do whatever possible to get caught up on past-due mortgage payments, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be the best option. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy is also known as a reorganization bankruptcy. It allows you, as the bankruptcy filer, to work with the bankruptcy trustee to create a repayment plan to catch up on qualifying payments. Chapter 13 bankruptcy plans normally last anywhere between three to five years.

Florida’s Bankruptcy Exemptions

Florida has one of the most generous homestead exemptions in the country and allows homeowners to claim an unlimited value of their primary residence (if the property is not larger than half an acre in a municipality or 160 acres in a non-municipality). To use Florida’s exemptions, you must have resided in Florida for at least 730 days before filing your bankruptcy petition.

Although bankruptcy and foreclosure can be damaging to your credit, sometimes filing for bankruptcy can be the start of rebuilding your credit because it allows you to obtain a fresh start.  Foreclosure not only damages your credit, but you are left with the mortgage debt, which will likely result in creditors not considering you for future mortgages.  If you find yourself facing foreclosure and are concerned about your financial future, remember that filing for bankruptcy may help save your home.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

 

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Are Lawsuit Judgments Discharged in Bankruptcy?

Some filers enter into bankruptcy with collection cases already at judgment level, with the hope that these judgments along with their other debts can be discharged through bankruptcy. However, getting a judgment discharged is not always so simple, and it depends on a number of factors, including:

  • What kind of case the judgment was for; and
  • Whether the creditor who has the judgment over the debtor has already placed a lien on the individual’s property.

Bankruptcy Discharge for Most Judgments

Generally, a judgment from a lawsuit involves unpaid debts. If the bankruptcy filer has not paid his or her medical bills, personal loans or credit cards, the next step for the unpaid creditor is usually filing a lawsuit against the borrower. If a judgment is obtained, the creditor can garnish the borrower’s wages or even go after a personal asset and have a lien placed on it to satisfy the outstanding debt.

Filing for bankruptcy activates what is known as the automatic stay, giving the filer reprieve from further collection calls and attempts.  It can also put a stop to wage garnishment and can wipe out the borrower’s obligation to pay back certain debts, even in a judgment. Once a bankruptcy case is filed, if a collections lawsuit is pending, the automatic stay in the bankruptcy will put a stop to the lawsuit. Even if a judgment has been entered against the borrower, the final discharge in the bankruptcy case will get rid of that judgment for most purposes, except in certain cases. If the judgment is for a debt that is considered nondischargeable, the bankruptcy will not get rid of the debt.

Nondischargeable Judgments

Some debt is non-dischargeable in bankruptcy. If the creditor has gotten a judgment against the bankruptcy filer for a debt obligation that includes one of the following debts, a bankruptcy discharge will not get rid of that judgment. These categories include:

  • Judgments connected to domestic support obligations, including child support or spousal support/alimony;
  • Judgments for criminal penalties, fines and/or restitution;
  • Most tax judgments;
  • Most student loan obligation judgments;
  • Judgments for any debts that were acquired under false pretenses or by fraud;
  • Judgments for injuries that were willful and malicious caused by the debtor; and
  • Judgments for any injury or death that was caused by the debtor’s drunk driving.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.alllaw.com/articles/nolo/bankruptcy/lawsuit-judgments-discharged.html

 

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Second Landlord This Month Held in Contempt of Court for Willful Violation of the Bankruptcy Automatic Stay

Miami bankruptcy attorney Timothy S. Kingcade’s Motion Granted by Judge, Creditor Required to Cease and Desist all Eviction Proceedings and Pay Attorney’s Fees and Other Sanctions

MIAMI – (May 11, 2018) This is the second time this month Bankruptcy Attorney Timothy S. Kingcade, founding partner of Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken and Attorney Kristina Gonzalez, have successfully obtained an Order for a client in a Chapter 7 case, requiring the creditor to  cease and desist all eviction proceedings and pay attorney’s fees.  The creditor in the case (In re Danny Looney Case No. 17-25332-LMI), Massmar Investments, LLC, was listed in the bankruptcy petition and was advised multiple times that the client was in bankruptcy.

“This is a victory today for our client. The landlord in this case chose to completely disregard the automatic stay put in place that protects bankruptcy clients from harassment and repossession of property. Despite having notice of the bankruptcy, the landlord continued with eviction proceedings, disregarded the law and harassed my client to no end,” Kingcade said. “Unfortunately, this is something we are seeing more of in my practice.”

The Order directs creditor, Massmar Investments, LLC to cease and desist any further eviction proceedings and dismiss the wrongfully filed eviction case, abide by the automatic stay, and pay attorney’s fees to Kingcade Garcia McMaken for having to bring forth the action.

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Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken was established by managing partner and bankruptcy attorney, Timothy S. Kingcade in 1996. The firm represents clients throughout the State of Florida in Chapter 7 bankruptcy and foreclosure defense cases. The firm is committed to providing personalized service to each and every client, clearly explaining the options according to the unique circumstances of his or her life. The office environment and the service provided are centered on a culture of superior client care for the financially disenfranchised. All partners and associates at Kingcade Garcia McMaken specialize in consumer bankruptcy and foreclosure and have dedicated their practices to this area of the law. Additionally, all attorneys and staff members at the firm are bilingual speaking Spanish.

For more information visit, https://www.miamibankruptcy.com/.

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief

Can Debtors Recover Damages for Emotional Distress for Violations of the Automatic Stay?

One of the benefits of filing for bankruptcy involves the automatic stay, a measure that goes into effect as soon as the bankruptcy case is filed. This automatic stay puts a halt to any collection proceedings or efforts, giving the filer reprieve from the continuous calls and communications from creditors seeking to receive payment on their debts.

Actual and Punitive Damages

Under the Bankruptcy code, if an individual undergoing a bankruptcy is injured by a “willful violation of a stay provided by this section shall recover actual damages, including costs and attorneys’ fees, and – in appropriate circumstances – may recover punitive damages.” 11 U.S.C. § 362(k)(1).  It is up to the court to determine whether “actual damages” includes damages for emotional distress, and this normally comes down to the question of whether the violation was accidental or intentional.

Was the Violation of the Automatic Stay Deliberate?

In some situations, a creditor can violate the automatic stay accidentally or unintentionally. Other times, the violation can be deliberate , and in complete disregard for the law. The stay is automatic, and many creditors, if they have a registered contact with the court, will find this out as soon as the stay is instituted. However, if the creditor is a smaller company, they may not find out quite so quickly, which means if the creditor continues to contact the debtor, that initial contact could be an accidental violation of the stay.

To seek damages for the violation, the filer needs to show the court that the creditor violated the automatic stay willfully. The creditor must have known that the contact or communication was prohibited but did so in spite of that knowledge. If the filer expressly gave someone employed by the creditor the information regarding the bankruptcy, then he or she has the evidence needed to show that the violation was willful.

Court Treatment of Violations of the Automatic Stay and Emotional Distress

Four circuits, including the first, third, ninth and 11th circuits, have affirmed that emotional distress damages are available if a creditor violated the stay. In recent cases, the courts have reviewed the legislative history and found evidence that the emotional consequences of the debtor were considered when creating the automatic stay. The history showed that Congress meant to protect not only the financial interests of those filing for bankruptcy, but the non-filing ones, as well. However, the fifth and seventh circuits have not been as strong in their rulings when it comes to emotional distress damages. These courts have been skeptical in the ability the bankruptcy court has to award emotional distress damages in a bankruptcy matter.

Filing a Claim

If a filer believes that he or she has been victim to a willful violation of the automatic stay, it is recommended that the individual consult a bankruptcy attorney before proceeding. The attorney can help determine what the best course of action is, given the circumstances of the case. A motion may be appropriate to request the judge to issue an “order to show cause,” requiring the creditor to provide the reason why the violation occurred. If damages were particularly significant, a lawsuit for these damages may be necessary and justified.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

https://www.thebalance.com/your-rights-when-a-creditor-violates-the-automatic-stay-316196

Bankruptcy Law, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Landlord Held in Contempt of Court for Willful Violation of the Bankruptcy Automatic Stay

Miami bankruptcy attorney Timothy S. Kingcade’s Motion Granted, Creditor Required to Cease and Desist all Eviction Proceedings and Pay Attorney’s Fees

MIAMI – (April 30, 2018) Bankruptcy Attorney Timothy S. Kingcade, founding partner of Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken successfully obtained an Order for his client in a Chapter 7 case, granting Emergency Relief Requested.  Florida Bankruptcy Judge, A. Jay Cristol signed an order holding the landlord / creditor, Jonathan Smith and Delores Smith in Contempt of Court for Intentional Violation of the Automatic Stay (In re Montalvo Case No. 18-11489-AJC). Creditor, Jonathan Smith and Delores Smith are directed to immediately cease and desist all eviction proceedings and pay Kingcade Garcia McMaken $2,250.00 in attorney’s fees for having to bring forth the motion to enforce the automatic stay and protect its client.

“We are extremely pleased with this victory for our client today.  The landlord in this case completely disregarded the automatic stay put in place that protects bankruptcy clients from harassment and repossession of property. Despite having actual knowledge of the bankruptcy and automatic stay protections, this landlord continued to harass and threaten my client, causing them unnecessary distress, even going so far as to serving them with an eviction lawsuit during the case,” Kingcade said.

The Order directs creditor, Jonathan Smith and Delores Smith, jointly and severally, to pay attorney’s fees to Kingcade Garcia McMaken for having to bring forth this action and to cease and desist all eviction proceedings until further order of court.

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Miami-based Kingcade Garcia McMaken was established by managing partner and bankruptcy attorney, Timothy S. Kingcade in 1996. The firm represents clients throughout the State of Florida in Chapter 7 bankruptcy and foreclosure defense cases. The firm is committed to providing personalized service to each and every client, clearly explaining the options according to the unique circumstances of his or her life. The office environment and the service provided are centered on a culture of superior client care for the financially disenfranchised. All partners and associates at Kingcade Garcia McMaken specialize in consumer bankruptcy and foreclosure and have dedicated their practices to this area of the law. Additionally, all attorneys and staff members at the firm are bilingual speaking Spanish.

For more information visit, https://www.miamibankruptcy.com/.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

What happens if a creditor tries to collect on a debt during my bankruptcy?

After you file for bankruptcy, creditors are not allowed to contact you regarding any debt you owe; they must deal only with your attorney.  The protections allotted by the bankruptcy automatic stay prohibit all collection activity, including legal action, wage garnishment, even contact by phone or mail in an attempt to collect on a debt.

There are a few exceptions. For example, the automatic stay does not stop criminal cases, some child support actions, and certain eviction cases. The automatic stay also does not apply to debts incurred after the bankruptcy case was filed. Here’s how to determine if a creditor violated the automatic stay and what you can do if a creditor continues trying to collect a debt.

The penalties for violating the automatic stay depend on the nature of the violation and whether it was done with deliberate disregard for the bankruptcy filing. You have several options if a creditor continues to pursue a debt in violation of the automatic stay.

Tell the creditor about your bankruptcy. Most debt collectors will stop contacting you if you tell them this.  Many times the debt collector is unaware of your case.  For example, if a collector garnishes your wages after the bankruptcy case is filed, it must immediately return the money.

Notify the bankruptcy court. If the collection attempts continue, the next step is to notify the bankruptcy court. The court can sanction the collector for violating its automatic stay order.

File a lawsuit. If a debt collector continues to try and collect on the debt, it may not only be violating the automatic stay but also other state and federal laws including, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA).

Our firm works to hold creditors accountable for violating the protections allotted by the U.S. bankruptcy laws.  Recently, our firm’s motion was granted by a Florida judge in a case that held the creditor in contempt of court for violating the automatic stay in a Miami bankruptcy case. The Order directed the creditor to cease and desist all eviction proceedings until further order of the court.  The creditor in this case was also required to pay attorneys’ fees for our firm having to bring forth the motion to enforce the automatic stay to protect our client.

If you are dealing with a creditor you think may have violated the automatic stay, contact your attorney immediately.  An experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney will know whether the contact was innocent in nature or a willful violation worth pursuing.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.