Credit Card Debt, Debt Collection

Debt Does Expire- Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Wait for the Clock to Run Out

At some point, consumer debt is so old that it is no longer legally collectible. At this point, the debt is said to be past the statute of limitations, meaning no creditor or debt collector can take the consumer to court to collect on the debt. However, even though creditors cannot collect on debt past a certain time period, it does not mean this is the best strategy for consumers to seek in cancellation of this debt.  

Every state has a set of laws that govern how long a party has to pursue a legal cause of action. After the timeline has passed, the individual can no longer file a lawsuit. For debt collection, the statute of limitation hinges on the type of debt. In Florida, the statute of limitations for debts involving written contracts, such as personal loans, is five years. The statute of limitations is four years for debts that stem from oral contracts or revolving accounts, the most common of these being credit card debt. After that point, the creditor is not able to legally collect on the debt. 

Debt Collection

Can a Creditor Come After Money that is Gifted?

The law allows for a certain amount of money to be gifted to individuals with no tax consequences on an annual basis. For the 2020 tax year, the gift tax exclusion amount is $15,000. Many aging parents take advantage of this exclusion to reduce their probate estate and avoid tax penalties by gifting up to this amount to their adult children annually. However, if the adult child they are gifting this money to has his or her own financial struggles and is being pursued for creditors, that money could be fair game. 

The problem is that this money is not protected if the receiving party is being pursued by a creditor for an outstanding debt. If the debt is valid and still legally collectible, money that is gifted to the consumer is reachable for purposes of satisfying what is owed.   

Debt Collection

How to Avoid Resetting the Clock on Old Debt

Once a debt is past a certain age, collecting on that debt through legal channels is barred under Florida’s statute of limitation laws. However, if the person owing the debt is not careful, the debt can be reset, making the amount owed legally collectible once more. Knowing what to do to prevent that from happening is important for this reason.

Understanding the Statute of Limitations

Every state has a set of laws that governs how long a person or entity has to bring a legal claim on any given issue, including debt collection. If a claim is brought after that period has passed, the claim will likely be barred. When it comes to debt collection, this timeline is five years from the date the debt began for written contracts, including personal loans. If the debt is one with a revolving account, including credit card debt, the statute of limitations is four years.