Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

When will a Bankruptcy be removed from My Credit Report?

Making the decision to file for bankruptcy is never an easy one. Many people hold off on filing for fear of what bankruptcy will do to their credit once all is said and done. However, having a bankruptcy filing on a credit report does not necessarily mean the end of your finances or your ability to access new credit in the future. It is possible to begin rebuilding credit after filing for bankruptcy.

What Type of Bankruptcy?

The most common types are Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is also known as a liquidation bankruptcy. This type of bankruptcy involves the bankruptcy trustee liquidating assets that are not otherwise exempt and paying off the qualified debts with the proceeds. Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows you to get a fresh start financially and erase past debts, but a legitimate concern consumers have is the effects it will have on their credit score and their ability to take out credit again.

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing will take approximately 10 years from the date of filing before the case will come off of the filer’s credit report. On the other hand, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy is known as a reorganization bankruptcy. This case allows the filer to work with the bankruptcy trustee to put together a repayment plan to pay for some or all of the filer’s debts over the course of three to five years. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy case will be automatically deleted from the person’s credit report seven years from the date of filing.

Can the Process Be Faster?

It is possible to have the bankruptcy removed from the person’s credit report sooner than is normally allowed.  There is a big misconception that bankruptcy cannot be removed from a credit report and that you will be penalized for 10 years, not being able to access new credit.  The truth of the law or the way law is written, there’s a maximum amount of time a bankruptcy can remain on your report, but there is no minimum amount of time.

This is done by filing a dispute with all three of the credit bureaus. It is recommended that the person reviews the bankruptcy filing and the specific debts related to the bankruptcy that appear on the credit report. If any incorrect items are found, the person can file a dispute.

When a credit dispute is filed with one of the bureaus, it must be verified and validated for it to stay on that person’s credit report. If the disputed items are not verified within 30 days of the dispute, they must be removed from the credit report, including bankruptcies.

Getting Back on Your Feet.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows you to get a fresh start financially and erase past debts, but a legitimate concern consumers have is the effects it will have on their credit score and their ability to take out credit again.

One of the biggest misconceptions about filing for bankruptcy is that it will ruin your credit score and your financial future.  To the contrary, after filing for bankruptcy you can begin restoring your credit right away.

If you have questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources: http://blog.credit.com/2018/05/when-can-i-get-a-bankruptcy-off-my-credit-report-65750/

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Myths about bankruptcy and your credit score debunked

There are many misconceptions surrounding the amount of time it takes to rebuild your credit after bankruptcy.  We are clearing up some of the common misconceptions about how bankruptcy affects your credit score.

Myth #1: All bankruptcy information stays on your credit report for ten years.

The Truth: Only the public record of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy lasts for ten years.   All other bankruptcy references remain on your credit report for seven years, including:  Line items stating “account included in bankruptcy;” Third-party collection debts, judgments and tax liens discharged in bankruptcy and Chapter 13 public record items.  Once these items begin to disappear, you will see a bigger boost to your credit score.

Myth #2: You will have poor credit as long as the bankruptcy information stays on your credit report.

The Truth: This is one of the biggest misconceptions and one that our clients can tell you is a complete myth.

My credit score said on all three reports 775, I couldn’t believe that I had such a great score before 10 years. Tim for me was the best move I have made for my situation. I have no regrets, I am glad the past is the past. – Bill T.

Hi Tim- I just wanted to send a quick note and thank you and your team for handling my bankruptcy case.  It is only a month or two after discharge, and my credit scores are already in the upper 600’s.  I’ve sent a screenshot in the event that you would like to use this to show prospective clients. – C.S.

You can begin to build your credit back with smart credit management.  Within a few years, you can obtain a “good” credit score ranging from 700 – 749 by doing the following:

  • Adding new credit, such as secured credit cards or small installment loans, to offset the negative information on your credit report;
  • Making on-time payments for all debt, new and old;
  • Keeping your credit card balances under 30% utilization.

Myth #3: Bankruptcy affects the credit of all filers equally, regardless of the amount of debt.

The Truth: Your credit score will factor in details such as the amount of debt discharged and the proportion of negative to positive accounts on your credit report. If you have a low amount of debt and only a few accounts included in your bankruptcy, your credit score will be higher than someone with a more severe bankruptcy case.

Myth #4: You cannot get a credit card or loan after filing for bankruptcy.

The Truth: Credit cards are one of the best ways to begin rebuilding your credit and you will be surprised how quickly offers for them will appear in your mailbox after filing for bankruptcy.  Secured credit cards, which require an upfront security deposit, allow you to spend and build credit easily and safely.

Myth #5: Bankruptcy will ruin your credit forever.

The Truth: Bankruptcy will damage your credit in the short term, but practicing good financial habits, can rebuild your credit to be stronger than ever. A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia showed that those who filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2010 had an average credit score of 538.2 on Equifax’s scale of 280 to 850. But the average score jumped to 620 by the time those bankruptcies were finalized, approximately six to eight months later. There are many ways to rebuild your credit after filing for bankruptcy. There are certain limitations you will face after filing, but taking advantage of the right financial tools can go a long way in helping you get back on the right path for your financial future.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Steps to Take if You Want to Buy a Home after Bankruptcy

After filing for bankruptcy, you are going to want to begin rebuilding your credit as soon as possible.  You can start by checking your FREE annual credit report on AnnualCreditReport.com to get reports from the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, TransUnion and Experian.

Your report may show late and missed payments on credit cards, mortgages and credit accounts you may have opened or closed.  Bankruptcy provides you with a clean slate, which means you have a second chance to pay your bills on-time and in full.

If your credit score is in the low 600s, your credit is still too low for most decent loans with good terms, but you can work quickly to get it back up in the mid-700s.

After bankruptcy, when accessing and utilizing credit again, keep your credit card balances relatively low compared to the card’s limit.  For example, less than 30% is typically advised while using just 10% of the available credit is even better.

Once your credit score improves, you can then find the right mortgage lender, real estate agent, and the right attorney to move forward with the purchase of your new home.

Still not convinced?  A testimonial from one of our clients in regards to their credit score after filing for bankruptcy.

My credit score said on all three reports 775, I couldn’t believe that I had such a great score before 10 years. Tim for me was the best move I have made for my situation. I have no regrets, I am glad the past is the past. – Bill T.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/where-we-live/wp/2018/03/05/financial-steps-to-take-if-you-want-to-buy-a-home-after-a-bankruptcy/?utm_term=.83d7fe172cc1

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Here’s How Much Debt the Average Consumer Racked Up Over the Holidays

A recent survey conducted by MagnifyMoney found consumers who took on debt this holiday season will start the New Year with an average of $1,003 in credit card debt.  Last-minute gifts, entertaining costs, and fewer hours at work, can all add up to additional credit card debt.

What is troubling about this year’s findings is that the majority of consumers who went into debt did not plan on it. The vast majority (65.2%) of consumers who took on the debt did so unexpectedly and did not budget for the added expense.

Nearly half (46%) predict they will need four months or more to pay off their holiday debt, or will only make the minimum monthly payments.

Even a seemingly modest amount of debt can quickly balloon over time if not paid in full timely. A person carrying an average debt load of $1,003 who makes one $25 minimum payment per month would need 58 months (4.8 years) to pay off their debt. That calculation assumes an average annual percentage rate (APR) of 16%.

Here are some ways to beat the holiday debt cycle:

Understand where your money went.  Track exactly where your money went the last three months.  There are useful apps that can help you understand where your money has gone. LevelMoney splits your expenditure into fixed, recurring expenses and variable expenses.

Carefully review your credit report. You can download your report for free at AnnualCreditReport.com for all three bureaus.

Use the debt snowball method.  A recent study found that consumers are more likely to stick to paying off debt when paying off credit cards with the smallest balances, first.  This strategy provides consumers with small “wins” against debt and builds momentum to keep you motivated.

Make 2018 your year to be debt free! By taking the right approach and building good financial habits, you can successfully pay down debt in the New Year.  Here are some ways to keep to your New Year’s Debt Resolutions. If holiday expenditures have put you over the limit financially, it might be time to examine your finances in closer detail and meet with a financial advisor or bankruptcy attorney.   Here are some signs you should file for bankruptcy.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://www.kgw.com/money/magnify-money/many-holiday-shoppers-will-start-the-new-year-with-1003-worth-of-debt/382430335

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

The Negative Effects Store Credit Cards Can Have on Your Credit Score

Getting a deal on holiday purchases can end up costing you more in the New Year- a lot more, in fact.  The reality of a cheerful sales clerk asking, “Would you like to save 20 percent on your purchases today by opening a store credit card?” Sounds tempting, right?  But these cards can ultimately hurt your credit score.   Store credit cards can have a large impact on your credit usage, which is a big factor in credit scores.   Applying for these cards requires an inquiry on your credit report and reduces the average age of your credit accounts.

Store credit cards have significantly higher APR’s and it is easy to fall into debt. The credit limits on these cards are typically 10 percent compared to other cards.  How much of your credit limit you use has a substantial impact on your credit score.  The one factor that matters more is paying on time. Credit experts advise staying below 30 percent of the limit on any card. Consumers with the highest credit scores use less than 10 percent.

When you apply for a store credit card, the card issuer will pull one of your credit reports.  This helps qualify you, but it can cause a temporary dip in your score. On top of potentially hurting your credit scores, retail cards have usability issues. These cards are good only at one store or retail chain.  They are typically accompanied by high interest rates and severe penalties if a payment is missed.  These cards also have less security features.

If you shop at a particular store often, it might be worth opening a store card to access ongoing discounts, presales and insider benefits.  But avoid making this decision lightly and in the checkout line.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Life after Bankruptcy: 5 Things You Need to Do After Bankruptcy

If you recently filed for bankruptcy, you are likely experiencing a sense of relief from having your debts discharged and getting a fresh start financially.  These tips for “life after bankruptcy” will help you avoid future debt problems and improve your credit score once your case is finalized.

Collect and preserve all paperwork from your case. Your bankruptcy attorney should provide you with a copy of your bankruptcy petition (i.e. – 40-50 pages of detailed financial information – including the facts about the debts and assets involved in your case.)  You should also have a notice of bankruptcy filing directly from the court, which shows the deadlines that affected your case.  Finally, you should have a copy of your discharge order entered by the bankruptcy judge. This is important as some lenders require to see a copy of the bankruptcy papers before lending you new credit.

Check your credit reports regularly. You can obtain your credit report for FREE from each of the three main credit bureaus once a year.  It is important to see what creditors are saying about you.  Especially after a bankruptcy, you want to make sure that all of the discharged debt is being reported to the credit bureaus with a zero balance so it does not count against you as outstanding debt.  You also want to make sure the account is not transferred to a new collection agency who falsely pursues you for the discharged debt.

Start a budget and review it regularly. Creating and sticking to a budget is the key to staying on track financially.  It is also a great way to manage your income and expenses and see where every dollar is going.  Just like in the Means Test that compared your income and expenses over a six-month period to standards set by the Census Bureau and the IRS. The concept was to identify those who actually had the means to pay their debts, but who were living an extravagant lifestyle financed on credit cards and other debt.  It’s an urban myth that people who file for bankruptcy live lavishly and are financially irresponsible. Statistics monitored since 2005 show that a very small percentage fit into this category.  Most bankruptcies are caused by an unforeseen illness or medical expense,  job loss, or even a divorce.

Start an emergency fund.  When establishing a budget for yourself, make sure you put aside a portion of your income for savings.  Having an emergency fund will help you avoid incurring unplanned debt or taking out cash advances to cover unexpected costs like a car repair or appliance repair.

Think about new credit.  A great way to rebuild your credit after filing for bankruptcy is to obtain a secured credit card.  You can open this card by depositing money into an account as security.  Your credit limit is the amount you deposited into the account.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources:

http://blog.credit.com/2014/12/5-things-to-do-after-bankruptcy-103308/

https://www.legalzoom.com/articles/life-after-bankruptcy-get-back-on-your-feet-after-filing-chapter-7

 

 

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Foreclosures

Life After Bankruptcy: Getting a Credit Card Again

If you have recently filed for bankruptcy, you may be wondering about the possibility of getting a new credit card. Before you apply for a credit card, it is important to make sure you have a stable job and the ability to pay your other bills such as rent and utilities.

If bad financial decisions led to your bankruptcy, you may want to avoid getting a credit card for a while. However, if unexpected events such as a divorce or a job loss led to your money problems, you may be able to handle a credit card again.

Below are three important things to consider before filling out a credit card application:

  1. Timing is everything. Your bankruptcy must be discharged before you can get a credit card. Lenders will deny a line of credit during a bankruptcy proceeding because the account can be included in the bankruptcy. It takes approximately three months for debts to be discharged after the initial filing of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy entails a three to five-year partial repayment plan and therefore takes much longer to be fully discharged.
  2. Weigh your options, good and bad. A recent bankruptcy will drag down your credit score for some time. As a result, you will likely receive credit card offerings from subprime lenders. Keep in mind that these credit cards typically come with higher interest rates and low limits. In addition, they typically require frequent fees that are much higher than most. A better option after a bankruptcy discharge is a secured credit card. This type of card is designed for consumers with bad or no credit. They are backed by a security you are required to put down. Secured cards have low limits and high interest rates but do not typically charge annual fees.
  3. Monitor your credit score. If you do get a secured card, do not spend more than 30 percent of the credit limit and pay off the balance every month. If you follow these two rules, your credit score should improve in time.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade Garcia McMaken website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

New Rule makes it Harder for Medical Debt to Impact your Credit Score

Consumers are getting some good news when it comes to their credit scores.  A new set of rules have taken effect this week that will make it more difficult for medical debt to damage your credit score, it will also not hurt your chances of qualifying for new credit.

The three credit reporting agencies now have to wait 180 days before putting an unpaid medical bill onto your credit report.  Going back and forth with your insurance company over an outstanding medical bill?  Unpaid medical bills that later get paid by your insurance must be removed from your credit report as well.

This new rule builds additional time between patients and insurance companies to resolve such matters.  Up until this point, there was no grace period and medical debt could appear on your credit report as soon as it was reported as an unpaid debt.  Medical offices tend to do this on their own schedule, sometimes as early as 30 days, while insurers may take longer to fully process claims.

The new waiting period carves out time for patients, their doctors, and insurers to work through legitimate grievances, and makes it harder for unpaid bills to hurt your credit score.  It also allows much-needed time for those suffering from illness and injury to sort out who owes what.

Credit bureaus have taken steps to remove medical bill collections that are less than 180 days old.  One out of five credit reports contain overdue medical debt, according to a 2014 report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. That means 43 million Americans have unpaid medical debt negatively affecting their credit.

If you are on a fixed income or struggling financially, letting the medical provider know you are not able to pay will give them a reason to offer you a discount or be placed on a reasonable payment plan.  If you cannot pay, tell them why you cannot pay.  Some states require hospitals provide free or reduced care to consumers within certain income limits.  Florida is one of these states.

Click here to read more on this story.

Those who have experienced illness or injury and found themselves overwhelmed with medical debt should contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney. In bankruptcy, medical bills are considered general unsecured debts just like credit cards. This means that medical bills do not receive priority treatment and can easily be discharged in bankruptcy. Bankruptcy laws were created to help people resolve overwhelming debt and gain a fresh financial start. Bankruptcy attorney Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade Garcia McMaken, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

What You Should Know before Closing out A Credit Card

When closing out a credit card, the effects it can have on your credit score lie in the details.  Here are some important facts you need to know before closing out your card.

  1. Age Matters. The age of your credit card that is. The average age of your open accounts makes up 15 percent of your overall credit score. So if the card you are closing out has been open for a long time, it really is better to keep it open and pay it in full, otherwise your score will be negatively effected.
  2. Available Credit. Your credit utilization ratio is important. A low credit utilization ratio would be if you have $300 or less on a credit card that allows you to spend $1,000.  A high credit utilization ratio is if you have $993 in charges on a card that gives you a credit limit of $1,000.  Lenders do not like you to do this and your score will be penalized as a result.
  3. Automatic payments. If you have been using your credit card to make payments on your car insurance or electric bill each month automatically, make sure and update this information timely before closing out the card.  This way you can avoid getting hit with late fees and other penalties.
  4. Rewards. If you have accumulated reward points on your credit card, redeem them first before closing out the card.  Otherwise you will likely lose them.
  5. Verify. It can take up to a month or two before the account is closed, so keep that in mind. Mistakes on credit reports are also fairly common. In fact, a recent study revealed that one in five consumers have at least one error on their credit report. It is always a good idea to double-check your account has been completely closed out.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.

Related Resources: http://www.cnbc.com/2017/07/12/10-things-to-know-before-closing-a-credit-card.html

Bankruptcy Law, Credit, Debt Relief, Timothy Kingcade Posts

Mark Your Calendars: Starting July 1, certain negative marks will vanish from credit reports

Starting July 1, many people with tax liens, civil judgments and certain medical debts will see a boost to their credit scores.  The three largest credit bureaus- Experian, Equifax and TransUnion, will no longer report a tax lien or civil judgment on a consumer’s credit report if it does not include the person’s name, address and either their social security number or date of birth.  Existing liens missing this information will also be expunged.

Consumer-friendly changes will also be made to the way medical debts are reported. According to the new rules, bureaus will not display medical collections until at least six months after the account became delinquent.  They will also remove any existing medical collections that insurance companies have paid or are paying for.  After the liens and judgments are expunged, some consumers can expect to see their credit score increase by as much as 40 points- enough to affect a loan approval or the terms.  The leading scoring company, FICO, estimated that out of 200 million “scorable” consumers, roughly 12 million will have a lien or judgment disappear from their report.

Starting July 1, the credit bureaus also will check lien and judgment data every 90 days to make sure the information is still accurate. These changes come as credit bureaus have been put under pressure from regulators and state attorneys general to improve the accuracy of credit reporting.  To confirm their data is correct, consumers should get a free copy of their credit report from each of the three bureaus once a year at www.annualcreditreport.com.

Click here to read more on this story.

If you have any questions on this topic or are in financial crisis and considering filing for bankruptcy, contact an experienced Miami bankruptcy attorney who can advise you of all of your options. As an experienced CPA as well as a proven bankruptcy lawyer, Timothy Kingcade knows how to help clients take full advantage of the bankruptcy laws to protect their assets and get successful results. Since 1996 Kingcade & Garcia, P.A. has been helping people from all walks of life build a better tomorrow. Our attorneys’ help thousands of people every year take advantage of their rights under bankruptcy protection to restart, rebuild and recover. The day you hire our firm, we will contact your creditors to stop the harassment. You can also find useful consumer information on the Kingcade & Garcia website at www.miamibankruptcy.com.